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Full text of "Annual report of the Division of Immigration and Americanization"






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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



Board of Higher Education 




Division of Immigration and Americanization 



FIFTY - SIXTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



July 1, 1972 - June 30, 1973 



Publication #6945 (40-300-8-73) 

Approved by Alfred c. Holland, State Purchasing Agent 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



THE BO^RD OF HIGH 



R 



EDUCATION 



John Adam, Jr. , Worcester - Chairman 
H. Irving Grousbeck, Boston - Vice Chairman 



Robert E. Barrett, Jr., So. Hadley 
Mrs. Sylvia K. Burack, Brookline 
Robert Do Gordon, Boston 
Dr. Gene P. Grillo, Bradford 
Mrs. Norman R. Jacobs en, Arlington 



Mrs. Mildred Downer Jarvis, Acton 
Malcolm Y. MacKinnon, Mill is 
Mrs. Florence R.Rubin, Newton Centre 
Mrs. William R. Spaulding, Wakef ield 
Sumner J. Waring, Jr. , Fall River 



Patrick E. McCarthy, Chancellor 



MEMBERS OF ADVISORY COMMISSION TO BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 



Pres. Robert C. Wood, University 

of Massachusetts, Boston 
Dr. Gregory R. Anrig, Commissioner 

Board of Education, Boston 
Pres. William G. Dwyer, Board of 

Regional Community Colleges, 

Boston 
Dr. Ronald J. Fitzgerald 

Director of Research, Boston 



Pres. D. Justin McCarthy 

Framingham State College 

Framingham 
Pres. Everett V. Olsen, Lowell 

Technological Institute, 

Lowell 
Pres. Donald E. Walker 

Southeastern Massachusetts 

University, North Dartmouth 
(vacancy - private sector 

representative ) 



BOSTON 
02108 



DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

Ma IN OFFICE 

Room 208, Tremont Building 
73 Tremont Street 
Telephone: 227-0719 
Supervisor of Social Service 
Mrs. Teofilia K. Tattan 



BRANCH OFFICES 



FALL RIVER 
02720 



LAWRENCE 

01840 



51 Franklin Street 
Telephone: 672-7762 
District Imm. Agent 
Daniel J. Donahue 

Rooms 308-309 Blakeley 

Building 

477 Essex Street 

Telephone: 682-2877 

District Imm. Agent 

Andrew W. Ansara 



SPRINGFIELD 
01103 



WORCESTER 
01608 



State Office Bldg. 
235 Chestnut Street 
Telephone: 7 34-1018 
District Imm. Agent 
John A. Mclnnes 

Rooms 401-402 
Park Building 
507 Main Street 
Telephone: 755-6815 
District Imm. ^gent 
Edmund B. Meduski 



Publication -,'r6945 approved by ;.lfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



i 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportbfdi1973mass 



REPORT OF THE 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

FOR THE YEAR 
JULY 1, 1972 to JUNE 30, 1973 

< • 

The Division of Immigration and Americanization in fulfill- 
ing its function "to bring into sympathetic and mutaully helpful 
relations the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin" 
ended, a most trying year of fifty-six years of service on June 
30, 1973, with having rendered 47,445 services to 22,499 
individuals. The Boston Office noted 24,690 services to 8,938 
persons; Fall River 2,636 individuals with 5,414 services; 
Lawrence 7,827 services to 4,094 applicants; Springfield 3,540 
services with 2,316 persons and Worcester 3,513 clients received 
5,974 services with Boston showing less services than l£i;t year 
due to loss of personnel as two workers who left the Division 
were not replaced. 

Our services in helping adjustment of the newcomer from 
abroad, in helping citizenship applicants and information and 
assistance in the various aspects of immigration problems 
requires the expertise and knowledge of the technicalities of 
immigration and naturalization laws as well as knowing social 
resources for referral in family situation. Our social workers 
and agents have helped solve every phase of immigration and 
naturalization status. The charts at the end of the report 
detail the various services given in our five offices. 

NATIONALITIES OF CLIENTS 

Of the one hundred countries of birth, as we record 
nationalities of the applicant, last year the highest number of 
services were to Portuguese with 5,792 (of which 3,759 were in 
our Fall River office) then Greek with 3,681 (in Boston 2,266), 
Italy with 3,447, Canada 2,646, Cuba 2,366, Poland 2,173, 
Jamaica 2,055, United States born 1,810, Dominican Republic 
1,742, Ireland 1,562, China 1,213, Uruguay 1,2.03, Colombia 1,916 
etc. For the past few years the largest alien group in 
Massachusetts has been the Portuguese. Of 384,685 immigrants 
to U.S. and 13,364 to Mass., in 1972 - one third came to 
Massachusetts - some 3,600. Abour every city and town in the 
Commonwealth is represented as residence of our clients. 

In 1920 when the count of services was 18,521, we have 
steadily increased and now for the past ten years we have 
averaged 51,000. 

RE ORGANIZATION RECOMMENDATIONS 

Under the reorganization plan of the Governor this Division 
with direction of the Executive Office of Educational Affairs, 
in bill 6160 was recommended to be abolished on the premise 
that there were other agencies where our applicants might be 
serviced. It was suggested that two particular agencies who 
have foreign born clients and who assist in some aspects of 
our service might be able to perform the service which we give 



in our five offices covering the State . Neither agency would 
be adequate and they only operate in Boston. One Agency with 
a most limited staff would not be able to tend the needs of the 
many foreign born persons. The other agency had only a part 
time worker, working on immigration problems . The Hulti Service 
centers in vicinity of Boston render assistance in some aspects 
of assimilation as housing, etc., and a few had attorneys on 
the staff who are not specialists in immigration laws and none 
have the expertise knowledge of laws and procedure to meet the 
needs of the large number of problems of foreign born in the 
Commonwealth. The teachers in evening schools and civic edu- 
cation, citizenship classes no doubt, teach the alien and 
assist in assimilation with basics of English, but they do not 
perform any actual work in problems in reunion of families 
abroad, naturalization procedures, applications, etc., and help- 
ing solve the many involved matters. 

Chapter 69 Section 11 under which the Division operates: 

"The director of the Division of Immigration and Americani- 
zation with the approval of the advisory board thereof shall 
employ such methods, consistent with lav;, as in its judgment 
. will tend to bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful 
relations the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign 
origin, protect immigrants from exploitation arid abuse, 
stimulate their acquisition and mastery of English, develop 
their understanding of American Government, institutions, 
and ideals, and generally promote their assimilation and 
naturalization. For the above purposes, the Division may 
cooperate with other offices and department of the Common- 
wealth and with all public agencies, Federal, State or 
Municipal. It may investigate the exploitation or abuses 
of immigrants and in making any investigation may require 
the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the pro auction 
of books, and documents relating to the matter Under in- 
vestigation. " 

In 1919, the Bureau of Immigration established in 1917 was 
placed under the Department of Education. Chapter 572 of 1965 
reorganizing the Department of Education placed the Division of 
Immigration under the Board of Higher Education. Chapter 704 
of 1969 established the Executive Office of Educational Affairs 
embodying all, the segements of the Department of Education. 

In this Commonwealth of 5,688,90 3 persons according to 
1970 census 494,880 foreign born and 1,397,064 have parents 
either foreign born or mixed parentage so that one-third 
population Is considered of foreign origin. 

There are 180,5 31 aliens registered in Massachusetts as of 
January 1, 1973, of whom 163,632 are legal residents and 16,899 



in some temporary status. Over 12,000 new immigrants giving 
Massachusetts as their destination came to this Commonwealth 
in the past year, Massachusetts ranks seventh in the United 
States with number of aliens and the list attached shows the 
many nationalities and non- English speaking persons represented. 
The Portuguese with 41,621 is the largest foreign speaking- 
group, with Italians 17,890, Greeks, 8,922, Cubans, 4,004, etc. 



Newcomers from the Latin countries and Western Hemisphere 
form a major part of the arrivals. They are largely from 
Dominican Republic , Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Jamaica, 
Trinidad, Tobago, Barbados and lesser from El Salvador, Peru, 
Argentina, Brazil. In the past ten years Massachusetts welcomed 
153,760 new immigrants. The nationality of those arriving year 
ending June 30, 19 73, follows and cities and towns of their 



destinations are on charts at the end 


of this repor. 






NUMBER OF IMMIGRANTS IN MASSA 


CHUSETTS (newcomers 


) 


1972-63 


1971-72 1970-71 1969-70 


1968-69 1967-68 


1966-67 


12,049 


13,364 15,769 15,212 


19,043 19,339 


18,246 




ALIENS IN U.S, DURING 1972 






California . 


1,017,323 






New York 


811,039 






Florida 


330,219 






Texas 


277,640 






Illinois 


273,034 






New Jersey 


265,650 






Massachusetts 


108,011 






ALIEN POPULATION - STATE OF MA 


SSACHUSETTS 




1973 1972 1971 1970 


1969 19^3 




180, 


531 188,011 172,793 168,516 


160,048 149,-;. . 





IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS 



The present law of permitting 170,000 immigrants from 
the Eastern Hemisphere to come to the U.S. with preferences 
to the relatives has greatly eased the situation to have 
brothers and sisters and married children of U.S. citizens 
join their relatives without waiting for a number of years as 
was formerly the case for Italians and Chinese. This situation 
remains the same with relatives of a few groups, as Philippines 
Kong Kong, Cape Verde Island and some British Colony subquotas. 
Our offices made 1,559 petitions in behalf of relatives. Our 
assistance included translation of foreign documents necessary 
to support such petitions as well as follow up with execution 
of affidavits of support and in many cases further corres- 
pondence with consuls abroad. 



NONPREFERENCE 



Because of the availability of the nonpref erence quota, 
many benefited this year to become residents. A number of 
elderly parents visiting their alien children in the U.S. had 
decided to remain in the U.S. and were able to adjust under 
Section 245 after the proper procedure was completed for them, 
We have the thanks of several Turkish born parents, a number 
of Greek ladies, a Russian and several Polish persons. 

The fifty- three orphan applications made for children 
under fourteen concerned children of several nationalities, 
the majority of them Portuguese or of Cape Verde birth and in 
many cases children of a father who had never married the 
mother. Now in the U.S. married to a citizen of the U.S., he 
was anxious to have his children join him. One such case 
involved triplets who were permitted to come and join their 
father under this law and are now legally adopted!! I 

LABOR CLEARANCES 
The labor clearance regulation prevents many a young 
person from emigrating to our State. Prospective immigrants 
without close families, as parents or spouses, sisters or 
brothers, are subject to obtaining approval of a job through 
labor department clearances. At present the approval of 
applications filed for "necessary skilled labor" has not 
been given because of availability of U.S. labor. Persons 
seeking information from us have been carpenters, masons, or 
other workmen, now no longer considered in the "shortage 
category" 



Information on immigration matters and procedures is the 
category in which we have the largest count and we have 






referrals from many social agencies, teachers, ethnic groups 
inquiring for information and assistance in the many problems 
of quotas, etc. For certain countries, various procedures 
must be followed. To have someone come from Poland, the 
matter is initiated with an assurance made in Polish which, 
after notarizing, must have legalization by the Polish Consul. 
Sent abroad to the applicant, it is the initiation of his 
request for Polish passport to go abroad. Ne assisted 231 
persons in this way. Proper preference relative petitions and 
affidavits of support for permanent residence or visits must 
also be made. 

USSR 'EMIGRES 

Ne assisted 94 persons in making assurances to have their 
relatives come from USSR. This document is in Russian and 
English, must not only be notarized but further legalized by the 
Seal of the Commonwealth and then the Department of State before 
being sent abroad for application for the exit permit. A few 
were for permanent residence and the majority for temporary 
visits. The procedure established, permitting some USSR 
residents to come as refugees via Rome, Italy, has reunited five 
families whom we assisted, were from Erevan, Armenia, USSR. 
The problem of the Jewish immigrant to Israel and to the U.S. 
is still unsolved 

CUBANS 

We assisted 296 Cuban-born persons to file applications to 
become permanent residents in the U.S. Although 4,004 Cuban 
born sre listed in the alien register roster of January, 1973, 
estimates are larger. A great number have become naturalized 
now. However, no more airlifts from Cuba bring these persons as 
this program terminated Hay, 1972. The total Cuban refugees 
admitted were the 621,403 from January 1, 1959, to 1972, when 
the airlift terminated. 

Ninety-two thousand ninety-seven Cubans were naturalized 
in the U.S. during the past ten years and in 1972 they were the 
largest group, 18,397. Alghough the airlifts bring no more 
from Cuba, some refugees as parents and children have come in 
this status from Spain. 

Applicants for whom we initiate applications to become 
residents require execution of several forms with pertinent in- 
formation of arrival and address and employment and always the 
personal documents needed to support these applications as birth, 
marriage, death, and divorce records are translated by our 
workers to accompany the applications. 



WESTERN HEMISPHERE QUOTA APPLICANTS 

Practically all these cases were family reunions, and a 
number of illegally resident aliens. They were persons who had 
entered as visitors, the majority between twenty and thirty- 
five years of age, coming from countries where the economic 
situation was most depressed. They started to work shortly 
after they came to the U.S. and many times moved from their 
original destination and then forgot or intentionally omitted 
to ask for extensions of stay, and were married in U.S. to 
legal residents or U.S. citizens. Many were apprehended by the 
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, but many voluntari- 
ly reported to the U.S. Immigration office. Because of family 
ties they were given opportunity to adjust their status by 
application at the nearby Consul in Canada. Some were mothers 
of aliens who chose to live in the U.S. after a visit here. 
Many aliens not authorized to work did find jobs because 
empbyers claim they are unable to find U.S. workers who will 
take those jobs. Many of these aliens were exploited by their 
employers by being required to work extra hours for which they 
were not paid, the withholding of overtime, and sometimes paid 
substandard wages. 

However since the regulation of April 1973, is now in 
effect whereby illegally resident alien married after April, 
1973 are not given the privilege of extension of time, to wait 
for action of the Consul in Canada, most applications have 
been started at the Consulates of their countries where they 
will return to wait for their turns in the quota. Most of them' 
are spouses of resident aliens and rone have crimminal records 
nor have been recipients of public relief. 

The first come first served policy of registration in the 
Western Hemisphere quota of 120,000 is the cause of anxiety to 
spouses. A number of our applicants who have come here within 
the past few years have returned to Jamaica or another Western 
Hemisphere country and married while on a few months visit, 
returning to their jobs in the U.S. Immediately they start 
the procedure to have the spouse be registered in the quota 
and wait for issuance of visa. The spouse immediately comes to 
our office to start the procedure to have the husband join her. 
The spouse will be registered by execution of the Form 1-550, 
but must wait his or her turn as it counts only from date of 
marriage and the wait in the Uestern Hemisphere quota is some 
twenty months at this time. Among the waiting wives are 
several prospective mothers almost desperate in their anxiety. 

Among the many immigration bills on Congress is one having 
passed the House which would establish preference similar to 
those now given applicants of Eastern Hemisphere birth and 
this corrects a sad situation. 



ALIENS IN IjASSjiCHUSETTS REGISTERED AS OF JANUARY 1, 19 73 



GRiJtfD TOT-L 100.531 



PERIL'. 


NEI7T RESIDENTS 163,632 


16,399 




OTHER 


THAN PERilJLTENT RESIDENTS 






Portugal 


41, 


621 




Canada 


30, 


099 




Italy 


17, 


890 




United Kingdom 


13, 


713 




Greece 


3, 


922 




Poland 


6, 


513 




Ireland 


4 4 


339 




Germany 


4"! 


335 




China and Taiv;an 


4, 


099 




Cuba 


4, 


r 004 




Jamaica 


3, 


,080 




India 


2, 


r 830 




Trinidad and Tobago 


1, 


r 712 




UcSoSoR. 


1, 


,453 




France 


1, 


,443 




Philippines 


1 


,431 




Colombia 


1 


r 330 




Lithuania 


1 


,310 




Haiti 


1 


r 279 




Dominican Republic 


1 


,259 




Brazil 


1 


r 187 




Japan 


1 


,134 




Barbados 


1 


,136 




Korea 


1 


,107 




Turkey 


1 


,098 




Honduras 


1 


,052 




Lebanon 




9 69 




Argentina 




948 




Netherlands 




902 




Finland 




813 




Sweden 




755 




United x^rab Rep e (Egypt) 




657 




Australia 




607 




Spain 




580 




Israel 




556 




Nor\7ay 




540 




Costa Rica 




533 




Iran 




5 30 




Ecuador 




527 




Czechoslovakia- 




430 




Latvia 




464 




Ilexico 




461 




Syrian Arab Republic 




439 




Guatemala 




473 




Thailand 




432 




Switzerland 




429 




Austria 




424 




Hungary 




402 




Panama 




365 




Venezuela 




341 




Albania 




340 



Yugoslavia 327 

Indonesia 320 

Romania 314 

So. Africa 308 

Peru 292 

Denmark 281 

Nigeria 277 

Belgium 269 

Chile 258 

Pakistan 229 

Vietnam 220 

Ghana 159 

Guyana 149 

Jordan 143 

ITev7 Zealand 132 

Ethiopia 132 

Uruguay 129 

El Salvador 126 

ilalaysia 110 

Iraq 104 

Liberia 86 

Iiorocco 85 

Kenya 31 

Bolivia 79 

Palestine 74 

Burma 67 

Bulgaria 65 

Ceylon 63 

Senegal 63 

Nicaragua 61 

Iceland 57 

Uganda 55 

Bangladesh 52 

Paraguay 47 

Cypress 47 

Singapore 46 

Estonia 43 

Libya 39 

Austria-Hungary 37 

Tanzania 37 

Sierra Leone 34 

Algeria 33 

Tunisia 33 

Laire 33 



TOTAL 179,066 



All Others Under 30 155 

U.S. Citizenship Claimed 166 

Stateless - 

Unknown 1.144 



GRAND TOTAL 180,531 



« 



HhTiou^LiTiES op liihiGRi-iiTs destined to iihsshcuussTTS 



JULY 1. 19 72 - JU1T1 



30 



TOTHL - 12,049" 



1973 



Portugal 
Italy 
Greece 
Canada 
Jamaica 
India 
China 
Engl and 
Haiti 
Trinidad 
Korea 

Philippines 
Dominican Republic 
Colombia 
Germany 
Barbados 
Lebanon 
Ireland 
Poland 
Thailand 
Brazil 
Honduras 
Vietnam 
Japan 
Turkey 
Egypt 
Syria 
Argentina 
So. hfrica 
Hong Kong- 
Guatemala 
Ecuador 
Costa Rica 
Pakistan 
Scotland 
Cuba 
Jordan 
hexico 
Spain 
Prance 
Guyana 
Chile 
... Indies 
Iran 



3684 


1646 


999 


575 


400 


397 


389 


350 


311 


265 


263 


227 


198 


131 


125 


122 


122 


107 


105 


92 


90 


77 


74 


72 


71 


59 


57 


57 


53 


51 


49 


46 


42 


40 


40 


37 


33 


32 


31 


28 


27 


24 


24 


24 



El Salvador 

Indonesia 

liontserrat 

Panama 

Israel 

Russia 

Bermuda 

Peru 

Venezuela 

Netherlands 

h.ustralia 

Bahamas 

Finland 

Hungary 

Switzerland 

hustria 

Lithuania 

Nigeria 

Hoeocco 

Romania 

hntigua 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Iceland 

ITorvjay 

Sv7eden 

Yugoslavia 

Belgium 

Kuv?ait 

17 eu Ee aland 

hales 

Bulgaria 

Nicaragua 

Bolivia 

I rag 

Liber ir 

Paraguay 

Uruguay 

Kenya 

Libya 

Palestine 

Singapore 

Tunr si a 

hlbania 



23 

22 

20 

18 

13 

18 

17' 

17 

17 

15 

14 

14 

13 

11 

11 
9 
9 
9 

n 
i_i 

G 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
4 
4 

3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 



TOT. -L 



12,049 



SOCIAL SECURITY CARD ISSUANCE 

New legislation introduced in Congress would provide for 
prosecution of employers who knowingly hired illegally resident 
aliens. A recent arragement has been made with the Immigration 
Service and the Social Security Office for check and issuance 
of social security cards. Applicants for such cards must 
furnish, if non-native, proof of citizenship otherwise proof of 
legal residence or permission to work issued from the Immigra- 
tion Service. If an applicant can present no proof that he has 
been authorized to take up employment, no social security card 
will be issued him and the U.S. Immigration Service notified. 
This procedure, it is hoped will help to stop the illegal alien 
situation and prevent such large numbers found in the country. 
It is believed there are many thousands of such persons illegally 
in the U.S. with social security cards. Implementation of the 
check-up procedure will prevent new such individuals from getting 
cards in the future. 

PROBLEMS OF SEAMAN 

A number of cases we have assisted have been the seamen in 
the U.S. several years, who had not returned to their ships 
after shore leave. Now married to a citizen or resident of the 
US. he has a family dependent on him. Ilany of these are young 
Greek-born in whose behalf we have acted. The U.S. Immigration 
Service grants them voluntary departure status and on petition 
of the spouse either nonquota or preference quota is established 
putting them in line for immigrant visa action. Their appli- 
cations have been processed at the Consulate in Halifax. Most 
of them were able to get the proper passport from the country of 
their birth, but for some^ho had not served in the military 
before departing from Greece this was not possible, as one of 
the requirements of the Canadian Immigration officials is that 
the person entering Canada must have a passport. Several return- 
ed to Greece to face fines, etc., as appointment with U.S. 
Consuls in other nearby countries could not be obtained or en- 
trance into those countries without proper passport was impossi- 
ble. 

CITI ZENS HIP AN D NATURALIZAT ION ASPEETS 

Some 116,215 persons were naturalized in the U.S. in the 
year ending June 30, B72. From the latest report with detailed 
figures available, Massachusetts naturalized 3,210. 

In our five offices, we filled 1,859 applications for 
petitions of citizenship. From the U.S. Immigration and Natura- 
lization Service report of this 3,210 naturalized their nation- 
alities were: Portugal 554, Canada 373, Italy 352, Greece 277, 
United Kingdom 205, China 176, Germany 145, Poland 120, etc. 



The report gives median age of persons naturalized as 34.4 

In the past ten years the largest groups naturalized in 
the United States were: 



Germany 


126,435 


Italy 


98,345 


Cuba 


92,097 


United Kingdom 


85,688 


Canada 


75,072 


I lex i co 


56,950 



Fear of being unable to pass the examination has prevented 
many older persons from applying for citizenship. A few of our 
applicants were in the category of exemption as they could sign 
their names and answer questions on the Government and History 
of the United States, but could not read. 

In Congress for the past several years there has been intro- 
duced the law that persons, then fifty years of age and having 
completed twenty years residence in the U.S. would be exempt 
from tests for admission to U.S. citizenship. Several of our 
applicants await and hope for favorable action and passage of 
this la\tf. 

The recent enactment of two years' residence after age 14 
for parent of a child claiming citizenship through his mother 
has helped several of our applicants. 

Our booklet, "The Constitution of the United States with 
questions and answers in preparation for citizenship" is , 
printed yearly and 10,000 distributed to applicants for citizen- 
ship, civic classes, civic groups, and foreign ethnic clubs. 

•Applicants for certificates of citizenship of whom we 
helped 198, have been mostly children of parents recently 
naturalized but several persons and the cases concerned had 
lived in U.S. since early childhood, having no knowledge of 
information of entry from overseas. Because no arrival could 
be verified to prove entry into the U.S. they had to go through 
registry procedure by furnishing proof of residence for many 
years in U.S.A. Much correspondence and search of census 
records had to be made but success came in the end and the trip 
abroad was possible with issuance then of U.S. passport! 1 1 

We have been privileged to have the fine aid of the U.S. 
Immigration Service personnel in our work who are always ready 
to aid in solutions. 



. 



Appearances at hearings at the U.S. Immigration Service in 
applications we completed for the applicants, answering many 



incjuiries on information and procedures from other social 
agencies , teachers, attorneys, and concerned citizens in 
ethnic groups, assisting students who call on us in projects 
for research, correspondence on the many cases, contact and 
interchange with other social agencies comprise the various 
phases of what we do. 

At the hearing on the Reorganization Bill H 6160 recommend- 
ing abolishment of this Division, many leaders of Ethnic 
Groups, City and State Officials, Attorneys, Social Agencies, 
as well as individuals came to the hearing and protested 
against the abolition of this Division - some 10,000 signed 
petitions were presented to the Chairman of the Committee. 

This Division established in 1917 has always been the 
mecca for the foreign born to come for assistance in many 
problems of assimilation. The stream of immigrants is continu- 
ous. Immigrants with their contribution to the cultural and 
economical, social background of the U.S. have always contri- 
buted both sociably, economically, culturally, to make this 
country the best country in the world. 

The status of the Division under the Reorganization Bill 
is still undecided as is all the reorganization structure and 
further action no doubt will be made. 

For the writer of this report, it is the final one, as 
Supervisor of Social Service for the past sixteen years, and a 
service record of fifty years with the Division. I know I 
have the gratitude of many individuals helped, and grateful 
for the knowledge that I have played my small part in "assist- 
ing the alien in assimilation to the mutual benefit of the 
foreign born and the Commonwealth" . As Ralph ~. T aldo Emerson 
wrote, "America is another name for opportunity; our whole 
history appears like a last effort of divine Providence in 
behalf of the human race". 



REPORTS OF DISTRICT OFFICES 



SPRINGFIELD 



On June 30, 19 73, the Division of Immigration and 
Americanization completed fixty-six years of service ful- 
filling its duties of helping to protect our citizens and 
non-citizens from exploitation and abuse bringing the foreign 
born in the sympathetic and mutual relations with the Common- 
wealth, developing their understanding of American Government, 
its institutions and ideals and generally promoting and as- 
similating their nationality. 

The last seven months of the year proved to be a very 
trying period and it was most difficult under the circum- 
stances to properly perform our duties and to remain dedicated. 
It was brought to our attention unofficially by a newspaper 
article appearing in the Lowell Sun on December 4, 1972, that 
it was proposed under the Reorganization of the Board of 
Higher Education that our agency of State Government be 
abolished. When this fact became known to our clients, the 
majority of whom we have served for many, many years, they 
expressed their opposition, unhappiness and resentment. They 
inquired about what they could do to retain "our office". 
They volunteered to sign petitions and corresponded with their 
Legislators to register their opposition to the elimination 
of our Division. Based on their own knowledge, they stressed 
the fact that our services are not available from the Federal 
Government nor from any other public or private agency. 

Individuals and groups contacted legislators both of the 
House and Senate from the Western part of the State alerting 
them to the recommendation of abolishment. With information 
of the work of the Division they were asked to consider the 
matter in the interest of their constituents, and register 
their opposition to that portion of the HR 6160 which would 
eliminate our entire organization which consists of the main 
office at Boston, and Branch Offices At Fall River, Lawrence, 
Springfield and Worcester. ilany of these Legislators replied 
with thanks for bringing the matter to their attention. Some 
have expressed their opposition to the elimination of our 
services while others have promised their most serious 
attention when the Committee on Education has reported to 
their respective branches of the Legislature. 

Hear the close of the fiscal year, it was rumored that 
the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service may 
close their Field Office at Springfield. If this develops 
there will be a greater need for the services of our office. 
Should it come to pass that the proposed abolition of our 
agency becomes a reality and the Federal Government closes 
their Field Office, the residents of our area - Western Massa- 
chusetts - will have no agency with the technical knowledge 
and skill to assist them. 



During the year 3,540 services were given to 2,316 indi- 
viduals. Applicants. came to us from forty-six cities and towns 
in our area. We had correspondence with eighteen persons, 
former residents who now reside in other parts of the country., 
Our statistics indicate that our applicants came from eighty-four 
countries , This year the native born citizens of the United 
States was the largest group we served followed by natives of 
Canada, Jamaica, Italy, Greece, Poland, Germany, Philippines, 
Barbados, England, Korea and Portugal. . , 

As has been the custom of the United States Immigration 
and Naturalization Service, they furnished to our organization 
the names and addresses of 816 new immigrants destined to reside 
in "western Massachusetts. Of his number 641 came to Hampden 
County, 85 to Hampshire County, 75 to Berkshire County, and 15 
to Franklin County. To these individuals we mailed a letter of 
welcome and extended to them an invitation to call upon us at 
anytime for advice and assistance with any problem they may en- 
counter in adjusting to their new way of life in America. lie 
advised them of the educational opportunities available to them 
especially those offered by the /.dult Evening Classes. They 
were instructed to conform with the regulation which requires 
them to report a change of address and to file the Annual 
Address Report. Male persons between the ages of 18 and 26 are 
informed of their obligations to register for Selective Service. 

The decrease in applicants for citizenship in jpart is 
largely due to the unemployment situation. The majority of 
applications we did handle were prepared for those who were 
most anxious to become citizens at the earliest possible date 
as they desire to travel abroad as United States citizens or to 
qualify for a license for some State Board. 

This year we received an unusual number of telephone calls 
from irate residents - both citizens and resident aliens - who 
wishes to report illegal aliens residing and working in the 
United States who are depriving either the caller, a relative 
or a close friend of employment. Since we are not a Law Enforc- 
ing Agency and have no authority to investigate and taking an 
individual into : custody , we directed the complainants to immedi- 
ately ap£>ear before the local United States Immigration Service 
or to telephone them for the purpose of furnishing full particu- 
lars about the violators. 

The several public and private agencies with whom we are in 
contact have been most cooperative. Especially has this been 
true of the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service, 
both at Springfield and Boston. 

We shall greatly miss the splendid cooperation of the 
two dedicated members of the Federal Immigration Service at 
Springfield. The General Attorney for Naturalization, Mr. 
Joseph Murray, retires late in June and the Investigator, Mr. 
John Burke, retired last February. Neither of" these gentlemen 
have been replaced as of June 30th. 



LAWRENCE 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1973, the Lawrence 
District Office rendered 7,327 services to 4,094 clients. This 
is an increase of 236 services over the previous year. We 
served individuals from almost eighty conntries last year. Two 
out of these countries, Canada and the Dominican Republic, 
accounted for almost 30/£ of our clients. Lawrence has become 
the home of an extremely large number of Spanish speaking 
people and the city in general has reflected this influx. 
Newspaper ads, store signs, banks and even the post office 
render information in both English and Spanish. Our office 
has also become geared to serving Spanish speaking people to 
the extent that this ^gent has learned sufficient Spanish to 
conduct an interview entirely in that language. 

This past fiscal year has been an extremely busy one for 
the Lawrence office. In December, along with our high volume 
of cases, a new problem came to plague us - the Governor's 
State Reorganization proposal which included suggestion of 
abolition of our Division. We have since been working under 
tremendous pressure, never knowing when the proverbial Sword 
of Damocles would fall and our office would be closed. Leaders 
of the various ethnic groups from Lawrence, Lowell and Haver- 
hill contacted the Governor, asking him to reconsider his 
decision to close this office. Newspapers and radio stations 
in the area as well as legislators, local political figures, 
private and public social service agencies, churches, at- 
torneys, leaders in industry and private individuals who were 
familiar with our services expressed their great concern to 
lose services of the Division and recommended reconsideration 
of the abolishment suggestion. The immediate response far ex- 
ceeded our expectations. Letters were written to the Governor, 
newspaper articles appeared, the radio stations broadcast our 
plight, the Lowell and Lawrence City Councils passed reso- 
lutions protesting our abolition, A protest petition circu- 
lated in the area came back with almost 5,000 names on it. 

As to this writing, the matter is in the hands of the 
Joint Committee on Education and has not yet been resolved. 
We are hopeful that the proposal will be rejected in committee 
and by the General Court. General consensus of opinions is 
that services so long in existence and so vitally needed and 
used by so many people cannot be terminated. It is hoped 
that our Legislative leaders are going to permit us to continue 
serving the people of the Commonwealth as we have been for the 
past fifty-five years. 

In spite of the specter of abolition looming in the 
background, our work in all areas of immigration and citizen- 
ship continued at a brisk pace. Assistance in immigration and 
citizenship matters, travel information, translations from 
Arabic, French, Italian and German documents for both this 



office and the Boston office are continuing at a high rate. 
Each newcomer to this area is sent a welcoming letter offering 
our facilities when needed, As always, we continue to maintain 
good relations on behalf of our clients with the various private 
and public agencies both in the United States and abroad. 

The Neighborhood Youth Corps is continuing to provide us 
with the services of local youngsters who have proven to be of 
immeasurable help in doing the routine work of the office. 

, We are most hopeful that this will not be the last annual 
report of the Lawrence office, but that our Division will be 
permitted to serve the people Of Massachusetts for many years 
to come. 

WORCESTER 

The Governor's Reorganization Plan created a real bug-a- 
boo for the .3,515 persons that we assisted with 5,964 services. 
Therefore within a few months, i^e accumulated 20,000 signatures 
protesting the proposed abolition of the Division of Immigra- 
tion and Americanization, of which the Worcester District 
Office is an integral segment. 

Possibly the proponents don't realize the onus of this 
pending legislation, but our clients express their observations 
while signing the petition to retain the Division. They cannot 
obtain this type of service from any other agency, and the 
immigration, naturalization, americanization, and travel 
problems, and forms they encounter are too difficult, compre- 
hensive, and technical for them to solve. The ones that 
traveled to the US. Immigration and Naturalization Service, 
Boston, Massachusetts, found the venture time consuming and 
frustrating because the function of that office is completely 
different than our endeavors in their behalf. 

Testifying at the Legislative Hearing on House Bill No. 
6160, held at the Worcester State College, Worcester, Mass., 
the Agent reiterated these sentiments, as well as submitting 
a local newspaper article, titled "State Service Called Vital 
For Aliens, Closing of Immigration Office Opposed", and 
another lengthy, . pictorial. Feature Parade issue on "The New 
Life Of The Greek Immigrant". Ethnic leaders from nationality 
groups, and clergyman, extolled the virtues of the Worcester 
office, especially in relation to their needs and requirements. 
The part of the hearing pertaining to our Division appeared 
favorable. 

But at the close of this fiscal year the specter of 
abolition is still up in the air. Numerous clients leaving the 
office say in a solemn manner "I hope the Governor doesn't 
close. the office", knowing that they would be losing a friend. 



F^LL RIVER 

At the close of the fiscal year, July 1, 19 72, to June 
30, 19 73, the Commonwealth completed fifty-six years of 
service to its residents. 

A total of 5,414 services were rendered at the Branch 
Office in Fall River. 

The work at this office consists of giving information 
mainly on immigration and citizenship problems - 2,202 such 
services were recorded this year. Assistance in completing 
applications required by the Federal Immigration and Natural- 
ization Service authorities as part of naturalization proceed- 
ings or in connection v;ith immigration proceedings - 1,666 
such applications. Execution of Affidavits - 240 such services 
recorded. Other services which include translation of docu- 
ments, writing letters to various agencies, assistance in 
immigration cases to adjust status from temporary or irregular 
one to a permanent resident status - such services totaled 
664. and Newcomer Interviews were listed at 562. 



/ 



Individuals served at this office were listed at 2,636. 
Many of these people returned two or three times seeking other 
required services. 

These clients came from thirty-one separate localities in 
Southeastern Massachusetts and they included natives and 
citizens of fifty-one separate countries. These ethnic groups 
were made up largely of Portuguese nationals, followed by 
natives of Philippines, China, Brazil, Poland and a smattering 
of other nationalities. 

In the last seven years an enormous number of Portuguese 
immigrants were admitted and they are now the largest ethnic 
group in the Southeastern Massachusetts area. 

Under Governor Sargent's propssed reorganization plan, 
it has been suggested that the Division of Immigration and 
Americanization be eliminated. This would create a tragic 
problem to the immigrant in seeking assistance in immigration 
and citizenship problems as the recent upsurge in immigration 
during the past seven years in this area the majority were 
processed through the Fall River Office. 

Many changes in citizenship and immigration laws makes it 
imperative that trained personnel is of the utmost importance 
in dealing with every day problems. 

The Fall River office continues to channel all appli- 
cations to the Federal Immigration Service at Boston and sends 
a list of naturalization applicants to the Adult Education 
Departments at New Bedford and Fall River in order that they 
may school them prior to taking the naturalization examination 



S r-1 

O H 

m > 

10 H H 

o p4 y 

l-J Oh 

s a 

STATISTICAL DETAIL 
Service Given 

FISCAL YEAR 7/1/72 - 6/30/73 
INFORMATION 5141 2282 2971 


i 

H ,A 

ot m 

04 H 

tO &4 

OFFICE 
1989 


r4 

w 

m 

m 

V 

01 

o 

♦^ 

- ALL 

3031 
291 


* ! 

' I 

CH 

o 

eh i 

i 

OFFICES 
15,414 


Booklets, Forms, Blanks 


1197 


581 


186 


222 


2477 




Citizenship 


183 


717 


531 


593 


799 


2824 


Immigration 


3599 
88 


664 


2065 


925 


1324 


8577 




Travel 


17 


175 


201 


616 
1 


1097 


Others 


74 


303 


13 


48 


439 


APPLICATION 


7468 


1670 


2735 


828 


1602 


14,303 


Change of Address (AR-11) 


80 


16 


19 


32 


25 


172 


Biographic Date (DSP- 70) 


148 
51 


3 


38 


9 
7 


7 


205 


Visa Reg (FS-497 & 49 7A) 


5 


17 


80 


Imm Visa application (FS-51 


.0)175 
292 


6 


64 


4 


6 


255 


Rep. Reg. (G-28) 


94 


96 


— 


53 


535 


Alien Reg. (1-53) 


633 


263 


659 


103 


259 


1917 


p 


Dup r.lien Reg Card (1-90) 


225 


65 


168 
22 


60 
11 


85 

12 
173 


603 


Pet. to Classify Status 

of Fiancee (I-129F) 


25 


9 


79 


Relative Pet. (1-130) 


981 


95 


232 


78 


1559 


Reentry Permit (1-131) 


242 


25 


88 


23 


52 


430 


Skilled Labor Pet (1-140) 


5 


4 


7 


— 


— 


16 


Foreign Police Clear. (1-484) 


— 


2 


— 


— 


80 


Registry for Citz.(I-4S5) 
Perm. Res. (Sec. 245) 


393 


2 
97 


25 

44 


1 
29 


3 


31 


71 
10 
23 


. 634 


Cuban adjust. (I-485A) 


233 


1 


52 


296 


Temp Chancre of Status (1-506) 50 
Ext. Visitor Stay (1-539) 


5 
162 


19 


— 


97 


208 


54 


205 


1119 


Veri - Legal Entry (1-550) 


470 


19 


134 


31 


11 


665 


Refugee-Escapee Ass. (1-591, 


1 4 

1 14 

70 


3 


1 


8 


Pet. Under Orphan Act( 1-600' 
Other Imm. Forms 


13 


38 


1 


— 


53 


49 


2 


21 


155 




Decl. of Intention (N-300) 


43 

941 

) 26 

>6)30 

40 


11 
291 


7 


10 


24 


95 


Pet. for Naturalization 

(N-400) 


241 


131 


191 


1795 


Pet. Nat'l of Child (N-402 


17 
1 

10 


12 


5 


4 


64 


Veri. of Military Ser. (N-42 
Dup. Certificate (N-565) 


2 


10 


— 


43 


17 


14 


12 


93 


Info, from Records (N-585 ) 


84 
55 
40 
)1498 
27 


4 


10 


4 


9 


11] 




Dermv. Cert.Appli. (N-600) 
Other Naturalization Forms 


34 


38 


33 


38 


19£ 


17 


10 


6 


5 


76 


Biographic Inf . (G-325-325A 
Mil. Biographic (G-325B) 


360 


408 


162 


303 


273] 


] 


34 


4 


8 


— 


7: 


Labor Clearance (MA7-50 A&B 25 


4 


4 


— 


— 


33 



13 


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o 


H 






r^ 




Eh 


J> 


M 


1 


tq 




CO 


H 


O 


O 


Eh 




O 


ft: 


S 


s n 


to 


^ 


m 




§ 


H iJ 


m 


•1 




.-3 


r4 m 


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EH 




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>— » 


P^ M 


PS 


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tQ iZ4 


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.". 





EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 



Affidavit of Support 

Affidavit of Facts 

Certificate of Identity 
U. S.S.R. Russian Assur. 
Polish Assuranc e 
Other Notarial 



2406 



1890 



10 



62 



107 



328 



236 



110 



491 



258 



302 



111 



77 



10 



21 



114 



73 



137 



582 3973 



370 2783 



24 



93 



95 



98 



20 



94 



231 



747 



OTHER SERVICES 



8363 



664 



1504 



276 



512 11319 



Change of Status 
Appearance at 
Interpretation 

Letters 

Others 





689 


102 


— 


41 


88 


920 


larings 


178 


— 


— 


— 


— 


178 


: Trans 


1219 


24 


121 


2 


86 


1452 



6277 



514 



1317 



233 



24 



66 



333 8679 



90 



NEWCOMER RESPONSE 



1312 



562 



126 189 



247 2436 



TOTAL FOR THE 

FISCAL YEAR 7/1/72 - 6/30/73 



TOTAL 



24,690 



5,414 



7.327 



3,540 



5,974 47,445 



BOSTON 



FALL 

RIVER 



lzwrence 



SPRING 
FIELD 



u 



iORCESTER 



TOTAL 



ETHNIC AND NATIONALITY STATISTICS 



1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 

10o 

11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
IS. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 

26. 
27. 

28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38 . 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
49. 
50. 
51. 
52. 



-lbania 
^lgeria 



33 



72 



112 



1 <L 



Ir; 
Ireland 
Israel 
Italy 



28 



1316 



10 



61 



126 



Antigua 


54 


- 


— 


— 


— 


54 


Arabia 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Argentina 


240 


12 


41 


8 


41 


342 


Armenia 


42 


— 


43 


— 


109 


199 


Aruba 


6 


— 


— 


1 


3 


10 


Australia 


11 


6 


4 


10 


11 


42 


Austria 


13 


1 


1 


8 


4 


27 


Bahamas 


33 


— 


7 


— 


- — 


40 


Barbados 


468 


— 


4 


81 


16 


569 


Belgium 


31 


— 


10 


5 


6 


52 


Bermuda 


30 


— 


5 


15 


12 


62 


Bolivia 


40 


83 


7 


1 


— 


131 


Brazil 


144 


— 


95 


3 


5 


247 


Br. Guiana 


17 


— 


- -. 


— 


13 


35 


Bulgaria 


45 


— 


5 


— 


3 


53 


Canada 


686 


78 


1112 


375 


395 


2646 


Ceylon 


3 


67 


— 


— 


1 


71 


Chile 


109 


118 


47 


2 


23 


299 


China 


1011 


24 


79 


56 


43 


1213 


Colombia 


631 


— 


123 


22 


90 


916 


Costa Rica 


356 


6 


19 


31 


3 


415 


Cuba 


1592 


16 


606 


27 


125 


2366 


Czech. 


35 


— 


3 


9 


61 


108 


Cyprus 


— 


— 


3 


.— 


- 


3 


Denmark 


13 


— 


— 


2 


16 


31 


Dom . Rep . 


534 


3 


1167 


30 


8 


1742 


Ecuador 


201 


— 


240 


40 


7 


438 


El Salvador 


135 


— 


6 


3 


1 


145 


Egypt 


91 


21 


16 


12 


39 


179 


England 


246 


64 


92 


91 


182 


665 


Estonia 


— 


— 


— 


2 


6 


8 


Finland 


14 


— 


— 


1 


50 


65 


Formosa 


13 


15 


13 


— ■ 


13 


54 


France 


102 


22 


67 


16 


57 


264 


Germany 
Ghana 


171 
9 


71 


93 


161 
6 


166 
53 


667 
68 


Greece 


2266 


46 


631 


240 


498 


3681 


Guatemala 


292 


2 


107 


5 


7 


413 


Haiti 


961 


— 


2 


7 


5 


975 


Honduras 


573 


— 


3 


14 


— 


590 


Hong Kong 


67 


11 


19 


1 


22 


120 


Hungary 


75 


2 


29 


3 


38 


147 


Iceland 


7 


2 


— 


2 


— 


11 


India 


219 


29 


140 


41 


193 


622 


Indonesia 


o 


1 


2 


4 


12 


27 


Iran 


49 


— 


14 


25 


64 


152 



11 


22 


63 


78 


97 


1562 


10 


41 


182 



1702 



39 



675 



296 



735 



3447 



BOSTON 



FALL 
RIVER 



LAURENCE 



SPRING 
FIELD 



WORCESTER TOTAL 



53. 

54. 

55. 

56 

57. 

58. 

59. 

60. 

61. 

62. 

63. 

64. 

65. 

66. 

67. 

68. 

69. 

70. 

71. ( 

72. 

73. 

74. 

75. 

76. 

77. 

78. 

79. 

80. 

81. 

82. 

83. 

84. 

85. 

86. 

87. 

88. 

89. 

90. 

91. 

92. 

93. 

94. 

95. 

96. 

97. 

98. 

99o 
100. 
101. 



Jamaica 


1549 


8 


27 


363 


193 


2055 


Japan 


79 


3 


5 


35 


43 


165 


Jordan 


24 


— 


14 


18 


2 


58 


Kenya 


- 


35 


— 


— 


1 


36 


Korea 


99 


— 


211 


78 


70 


458 


Latvia 


50 


42 


— 


— 


5 


97 


Lebanon 


239 


— 


511 


57 


113 


920 


Liberia 


62 


— 






6 


68 


— 


— 


Libya 


6 


— 


— 


1 


— 


7 


Lithuania 


119 


— 


24 


3 


106 


252 


Hal ay a 


1 


= 


= 


2 


= 


3 


Mexico 


95 


— 


17 


13 


23 


15 3 


Montserrat 


214 


— 


— 


— 


— 


214 


Morocco 


31 


— 


— 


7 


— 


33 


Netherlands 


33 


15 


15 


1 


34 


98 


N. Zealand 


2 


5 





2 


11 


20 


Nicaragua 


29 


— 


3 


7 


2 


41 


Norway 


10 


54 


2 


5 


— 


71 


:her Countries 133 


33 


32 


15 


18 


231 


Pakistan 


15 


— 


11 


4 


15 


45 


Palestine 


13 


— 


13 


7 


— 


33 


Panama 


153 


3 


16 


55 


23 


255 


Paraguay 


18 


— 


— 


3 


— 


21 


Peru 


92 


5 


39 


17 


6 


159 


Philippines 


315 


169 


27 


131 


71 


713 


Poland 


1163 


90 


207 


214 


494 


2173 


Portugal 


1411 


3759 


498 


77 


36 


5792 


Puerto Rico 


153 


— 


44 


11 


7 


215 


Romania 


86 


3 


8 


6 


37 


140 


Saudi Arabia 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


Scotland 


85 


10 


45 


15 


29 


134 


So. Africa 


49 


19 


— 


11 


— 


79 


Spain 


93 


25 


37 


24 


21 


200 


St. Lucia 


9 


— 


— 


12 


1 


22 


Sweden 


11 


3 


— 


3 


44 


61 


Sv;itz„ 


13 


— 


1 


1 


6 


26 


Syria 


94 


5 


94 


2 


49 


244 


Thailand 


69 


2 


18 


17 


51 


157 


Trinidad 


930 


— 


6 


31 


7 


974 


Turkey 


314 


— 


47 


37 


147 


545 


Ukraine 


11 


3 


— 


2 


— 


16 


U.S.S.R 


186 


2 


44 


42 


34 


308 


Uruguay 


1197 


— 


1 


— 


5 


1203 


United States 


343 


156 


423 


854 


1810 


Venezuela 


67 


1 


34 


3 


3 


108 


Vietnam 


26 


1 


8 


17 


21 


73 


./ales 


1 


— 


— 


— 


6 


7 


17. Indies 


314 


26 


2 


6 


4 


352 


Yugoslavia 


64 


1 


2 


4 


37 


158 



TOTAL 



24,690 



5,414 



7,827 



3,540 



5,974 



47,445 



BOSTON 



P*iLL 

RIVER 



LAh'REiTCE 



SPRIiTG 
FIELD 



WORCESTER TOTAL 



LOCALITIES 



'Isear Year 7/1/72 - 6/30/73 



OFFICES - ALL OFFICES 



Abington 


19 


— 


— 


— 


— 


19 


."icton 


3 


— 


3 


— 


— 


11 


Acushnet 


1 


26 


— 


— 


— 


27 


Ag attain 


— 


— 


— 


92 


— 


92 


Araesbury 


10 


— 


7 


— 


— 


17 


Amherst 


4 


— 


4 


29 


— 


37 


^ndover 


20 


— 


176 


— 


— 


196 


Arlington 


ISO 


— 


5 


— 


— 


193 


Ashland 


2 


— 


— 


— 


5 


7 


Athol 


27 


— 


5 


— 


9 


41 


I.ttleboro 


9 


44 


— 


— 


— 


53 


Auburn 


— 


— 


— 


— 


62 


62 


Avon 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Ayer 


15 


— 


10 


— 


58 


83 



Barns table_ 

Bar re _ 

Becket 



Bedford 

Bel cher tov;n_ 

Bellingliam__ 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Billerica 

Blades tone 

Ian ford 

Bolton 

Boston 

Bourne 

Boxbbro 

Boxforc 

Boylston 

Braintree 

Brewster 



40 



20 



1 



44 



171 



16 



46 



13,486 



52 



Bridget? at er 



11 



Brimfieldj 

Brockton 



366 



Brookf ield 
3rookline_ 
Burl inr ton 



518 



66 



51 



39 



38 



60 



38 



44 



o 



172 

"17 



97 



43 



14 



13,532 

11 

' f 

4 

_T3" 
66 



11 



11 
12' 



369 



37 



37 



4 
4 



522 



70 



FALL SPRING 2 

BOSTON RIVER LAURENCE FIELD WORCESTER TOTAL 



Cambridge 


1476 


3 


— 


3 


— 


1482 


Canton 


3.0 


. — 


— 


— 


— 


30 


Carlisle 


13 


— 


— 


— 


— 


13 


Carlton 


— 


— 


— 


— 


36 


36 


d a at nam 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


Chelmsford 


35 


- 


133 


— 


— 


168 


Chelsea 




— 


— 


— 


— 


388 


Chester 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Chicopee 


5 


— 


1 


423 


— 


429 


Clinton 


1 


— 


— 


1 


147 


149 


Cohasset 


26 


— 


— 


— 


— 


26 


Concord 


31 


— 


8 


— 


— 


39 


Concoid 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Dan.vers 


20 




3 






23 


Dartmouth 


— 


126 


— 


— 


— 


126 


Dedham 


107 


4 


— 


— 


111 


Deerf ield 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


Dennis 


20 


— 


— 


- 


- 


20 


Dighton 


— 


2 


— 


— 


- 


2 


Dougl as 


— 


— 


— 


— 


26 


26 


Dover 


3 


— 


— 


— 


- 


8 


Dracut 


4 


— 


73 


— 


109 


136 


Dudley 


1 


— 


— 


3 


— 


4 


Duxbury 


14 


— 


— 


— 


— 


14 


East Bridgewater 


1 










1 


East Brookfield 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


E o Longmeadow 


1 


— 


— 


15 


— 


16 


Easthampton 


2 


— 


— 


11 


- 


13 


Easton 


6 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6 


Everett 


289 


— 


— 


— 


- 


289 


Fairhaven 


4 


131 








135 


Fall River 


18 


2887 


— 


— 


— 


2905 
61 


Falmouth 


39 


21 


— 


- 


1 


Fitchburg 


6 


- 


— 


- 


72 


78 


Zoxboro 


3 


— 


— 


- 


— 


3 


Framingham 


154 


— 


— 


— 


20 


174 


Franklin 


43 


1 


— 


— 


— 


44 


Feeetox-jn 


— 


13 


— 


— 


— 


13 


Gardner 


9 




2 




61 


72 


Georgetovm 


1 


— 


8 


— 


— 


9 


Gloucester 


99 


i 


— 


— 


— 


100 


Grafton 


— 


— 


— 


— 


109 


109 


Granby 


— 


— 


6 


— 


6 


Gi o Bariington 


2 


— 


— 


3 


— 


5 


Greenfield 


1 


- 


— 




— 


9 


Groton 


2 


— 


— 


— 


3 


5 


Grovel and 


1 


= 


16 


- 


— 


17 



^V-LL SPRING 3 

30ST017 RIVLR L^.RLiJCE FILLD WORCESTER TOTLX 



naaiey 


3 


— 


— 


4 


— 


o 

u 


Hamilton 


14 


— 


4 


— 


— 


1 o 


Hampden 


— 


- 


— 


O 


— 


o 
O 


Hanover 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Hanson 


5 


- 


— 


— 


— 


5 


Kardwick 


- 


— 


— 


2 


6 


8 


Harvard 


1 


— 


— 


— 


2 


3 


Harwich 


9 


— 


— 


— 


9 


Hatfield 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Haverliill 1 


6 
5 


— 


328 


— 


— 


334 


i-nnc;.iam 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


Holbrook 


3 


— 


— 


3 


Hoi den 


1 


— 


— 


— 


74 


75 


Hoi lis ton 


20 


— 


— 


— 


1 


21 


Hoi yoke 


36 


— 


— 


194 


— 


230 


Hopedale 


1 


— 


— 


— 


3 


4 


Hopkinton 


5 


— 


— 


— 


27 


32 


Hubbardston 


2 


— 


— 


— 


6 


8 


Hudson 


3 


— 


— 


— 


46 


49 


Hull 


11 


~ 




— 


— 


11 



Ipswicli 



Kingston 


2 










2 


Lakeville 




3 








3 


Lancaster 


3 


— 


2 


— 


120 


125 


Lawrence 


46 


— 


3925 


— 


— 


39 71 


Lee 


2 


— 


1 


— 


3 


Leicester 


— 


— 


— 


— 


71 


71 


Lenox 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


3 


Leominster 


5 


— 


— 


1 


47 


53 


Lincoln 


4 


— 


— 


— 


- 


4 


Littleton 


1 


— 


9 


— 


— 


10 


Longmeadow 


1 


— 


— 


39 


— 


40 


Lowell 


50 


— 


1076 


— 


- 


1926 


Ludlow 


22 


— 


— 


123 


- 


145 


Lunenbu_c- 


1 


— 


- 


— 


- 


1 


j-^ynn 


443 


— 


1 


- 


- 


444 


Lynnf ield 




- 


- 


- 


— 


o 

O 


Lexington 


6G 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6G 


Hal den 


207 










207 


Handles te_ 


7 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


Hansf ield 


6 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6 


Harblel.ead 


7 


- 


— 


— 


— 


7 


juanon 


1 
24 " 


11 


— 


- 


— 


12 


Harlboro 


— 


— 


64 




liar si if ield 


23 


— 


- 


— 


1 


24 



BOSTON 



FALL 
RIVER 



LATJRENC] 



SPRING 

FIELD WORCESTER 



4 
TOTAL 



Mattapoisett_ 
May n ar ti , 
Medf i e 1 d 

Medford 

Medw ay 

Mel ros e 

Mendon 



12 



36 



10 



242 



25 



49 



Merrimac 

Methuen 

Middleboro 
Middleton__ 
Mil ford 



Mi 11 bury 

Mill is 



Millville_ 

Milton 

Monson _ 
Montague 



Montgomery 



17 



31 



404 



98 



59 



15 



41 



10 



276 



28 
58 



407 



12 



115 



59 



N ah ant 

Nantucket_ 
Natick 



Ne edh am 

New Bedford_ 
Newburypoet 

Newton 

Norfolk 



S 



No. Andove r 
No. Brookfield 

No. Reading 

Northampton 

No rthbo rough _ 

Northbridge 

Northf ield 

No r t o n 

Norwell = 

Norwood 



3± 
60 



57 



403 



1587 



16 



79 



8 



54 



107 



55 



212 



10 



36 



77 



1644 



18 



403 



81 



c;~ 



lir 



5i 



21 



Orange ... 
Orleans^ 
Oxford 



12 



48 



53 



Palmer 

Paxto n 

Peabody 

Pembroke 

Pepperell_ 

Petersham 



334 



a 



29 



24 



30 



16 



_2 
3C 



BOSTON 



r--±j.L 

RIVER 



J-u»««'RIj1TC,lj 



SPRING 
?IELD 



WORCESTER 



TOTAL 



Pittsfield 


6 


- 


— 


2 


_ 


8 


Plainville 


6 


8 


— 


— 


_ 


14 


Plymouth 


41 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


41 


Plympton 


1 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


1 


Princecon 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


23 


23 


Provincetown 


2 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


2 


Quincy 


329 




3 






332 


Randolph 


39 










39 


Ray h an 


4 


2 


— 


_ 


_ 


6 


Reading 


11 


— 


13 


— 


_ 


24 


Revere 


146 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


146 


Rochester 


- 


16 


~ 


— 


— 


16 


Rockland 


16 


— 


— 


_ 


— 


16 


Rockport 


5 


— 


— 


— 


5 


Rov:l ey 


— 


— 


9 


— 


— 


9 


Rutl and 


- 


— 


— 


— 


30 


30 


Salem 


133 




25 






208 


Salisbury 


— 


— 


2 


— - 


— 


2 


Saugus 


62 

70 


— 


— 


— 


— 


62 


Scituate 


— 


— 


— 


— 


70 


Seekonk 


— 


5 


— 


— 


— 


5 


Sharon 


25 


— 


— 


— 


- 


25 


Sherborn 


2 


— 


— i 


— 


— 


2 


Shirley 


— 


— 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Shrewsbury 


1 


— 


— 


— 


235 


236 


Shutesbury 


— 


— 


— 


1 


- 


1 


Somerset 


1 


253 


— 


— 


— 


254 


Somerville 


943 


— 


2 


— 


— 


945 


So. Hadley 


— 


— 


— 


22 


— 


22 


Southampton 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


3 


Southbo rough 


10 


— 


— 


— 


5 


15 


Southbridge 


— 


- 


— 


— 


170 


170 


Southv/ick 


— 


— 


— 


19 


— 


19 


Spencer 


— 


— 


r- 


— 


34 


34 


Springf ield 


19 


— 


13 


1977 


— 


2009 


Sterling 


— 


— 


— 


— 


26 


26 


Stockbridge 


2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Stoneham 


72 


— 


72 


— 


— 


144 


Stoughton 


30 


— 


— 


— 


— 


30 


Stur bridge 


■ — 


— 


— 


— 


34 


34 


Sudbury 


9 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


Sunderland 


— 


— 


— 


2 


- 


2 


Sutton 


— 


— 


- 


— 


18 


18 


Swamoscott 


33 


— 


— 


— 


- 


33 


Swansea 


2 


63 


— 


— 


- 


65 





BOSTON 


FALL 

RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


: i 
TOTAL ' 


Taunton 


25 


78 








i 
103 


Templeton 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


3 


Tewksbury 


20 


— 


22 


— 


— 


42 


Tops field 


1 


— 


11 


— 


. — 


12 


Towns end 


9 


— 


— 


— 


1 


10 


Tyngsboro 


— 


— 


13 


— 


- 


13 


Upton 










21 


21 


Uxbridge 


3 


— 


— 


— 


47 


50 


Wakefield 


68 




25 






93 


Wales 


— 


— 


— 


5 


— 


5 


Walpole 


35 


— 


— 


— 


— 


35 


Walt ham 


371 


— 


6 


— 


— 


377 


Ware 


2 


— 


— 


22 


31 


55 


War eh am 


8 


24 


— 


— 


— 


32 


Warren 


— 


— 


— 


— 


28 


28 


Water town 


555 


— 


5 


— 


1 


561 


I J ay land 


21 


— 


— 


— 


- 


21 


I.ebster 


1 


— 


— 


— 


169 


170 


Wellesley 


63 


— 


— 


— ■ 


— 


63 


Wellsfleet 


1 


— 


— 


— 


- 


1 


Uo Boylston 


— 


— 


— 


— 


36 


36 


Wo Brookfield 


— 


— 


— 


— 


32 


32 


Wo Springfield 


— 


— 


2 


162 


- 


164 


West bo rough 


5 


— 


— 


— 


83 


93 


Westf ield 


— 


— 


— 


194 


— 


194 


Westford 


3 


— 


10 


— 


— 


13 


Westminster 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 
8 


Weston 


8 


— 


— 


— 


Westport 


— 


55 


— 


— 


— 


55 


Westwood 


15 


— 


— 


— 


— 


ia 


Weymouth 


98 


— 


— 


— 


— 


98 


Whitman 


7 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


Wilbraham 


— 


— 


25 


— 


25 


Uilliamsburg 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Williams town 


9 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


Wilmington 


9 


- 


7 


- 


- 


16 


Winchendon 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Winchester 


63 

44 


— 


- 


- 


— 


63 


Winthrop 


— 


— 


— 


— 


44 
111 


Woburn 


80 
67 


— 


31 


— 


Worcester 


— 


— 


1 


3136 


3204 


Wrentham 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


Yarmouth 


22 


2 








24 


Out of State 


355 




232 


18 


12 


617 


TOTAL 


24,690 


5,414 


7,827 


3,540 


5,974 


47,445 



DESTINATION OF IAHIGRANTS 
IN ICiSSACHUSETTS 



Page 1 



JULY 1, 1972 - JUNE 30, 1973 



ACTON 



ACUSHAET 
Portugal 



ADA1IS 



aga:i 



4.-X 



C^NADa 
Engl and 
Italy 
TOTAL 



5 
3 
6 



14 



.UJHERST 

China 

Colombia 

Don o Rep «. 

Engl and 

Hone; Kong 

India 

Jamaica 

Nether lanes 

Philippines 

Vietnam 



4 

2 

1 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 

1 
1 






TOTAL - 12,049 



x »IiiJOj_>Ux\j. 



Canada 


1 


Canada 


Colombia 


1 




Engl and 


1 


t 


Guatemala 


1 


;jsdover 


India 


2 


Australia 


Iran 


1 


Bermuda 


Greece 


1 


Brazil 


Lebanon 


1 


Canada 


Ilorocco 


1 


China 


Pakistan 


1 


Colombia 


Spain 


1 


Cuba 


Thailand 


4 


Engl and 


Vietnam 


1 


Formosa 


Yugoslavia 


1 


Germany 


TOTAL 


13 


Ireland 



Chile 


5 


Engl and 


1 


Honduras 


2 


Lebanon 


1 


Kuwait 


7 


total 


16 



Japan 
Korea 
Iran 
TOTi.L 



ARLINGTON 
Canaca 
China 
Egypt 
Cuba 
England 
Germany 
Greece 
India 
Ireland 
Italy 
Japan 
Korea 
-Pakistan 
Portugal 
Peru 



Sweden 

Syria 

Turkey 

TOTAL 



ASIIDURNHAi -i 
Canada 
Korea 
TCT..L 



1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 



19 



4 

2 

3 

2 

3 

7 

26 

12 

3 

5 

2 

1 

1 

21 

1 



109 



1 
1 



ASHLAND 

Brazil 



ATHOL 

Engl and 

Korea 

TOTAL 



A 1 



TLEBORO 



Brazil 

Canada 

China 

Guatemala 

Germany 

Greece 

Hong Kong 

India 

Ireland 

Italy 

Philippines 

Portugal 

Switz. 

TOTAL 



:.UBUR1? 

Canada 

Denmark 

Germany 

Korea 

TOTAL 



,.VON 
Italy 
Korea 
TOTAL 



. * X JJzx. 



TOT-.L 



China 

Chile 

Germany 

Iran 

Japan 

Panama 

Thailand 

Vie tn an 

TOTAL 



1 
1 



1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 
1 
2 
30 



57 



1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 



5 

1 
7 
1 
6 
3 
1 
1 



BARNSTABL2 

Bahames 2 

Canada 1 

Chile 5 

China 1 

Engl and 3 

Germany 5 

Greece 7 

Ireland 1 

Japan 1 

Korea 2 

Lebanon 1 

Liberia 1 
Netherlands 1 

Portugal 11 

Russia 1 

Thailand 3 

Trinidad 1 

Turkey 1 

Vietnam 3_ 

TOTAL 51 



BARRINGTON 
Ecuador 4 

Scotland 2_ 

TOTAL 6 



BEDFORD 



England 


1 


Iran 


1 


Japan 


2 


Korea 


2 


Portugal 


4 


Philippines 


2 


Scotland 


1 


Venezuela 


2 




15 


TOx\.L 



,-li-I 



LCH2RTOAT7 



Philippines 



DELLINGH..ii 

Norway 

Romania 



r 1 s-.i 1 
X Ui.. 



1 
1 



25 



Page 2 



BELMONT 



Canada 


2 


China 


. 5 


Colombia 


1 


Ecuador 


3 


England 


2 


Greece 


1 


India 


3 


Israel 


1 


Italy 


13 


Jamaica 


2 


Japan 


4 


Korea 


1 


Lebanon 


2 


Libya 


2 


Poland 


1 


Portugal 


1 


Syria 


4 


Trinidad 


2 


Venezuela 


2 


Vietnam 


1 


TOT.-L 


53 


BEVERLY 





1 
1 



Canada 

Egypt 

Germany 

Guyana 

Greece 

Guatemala 

Indonesia 

Italy 

Japan 

Korea 

Netherlands 

Pakistan 

Phillipines 

Scotland 

Vietnam 

Wales 

tot;.l 



BILLERIC;. 

China 

Canada 

Colombia 

Iran 

Korea 

Portugal 

TOTAL 



9 
2 
1 
1 
4 
4 

3 

6 

1 
4 

2 

1 
1 
1 
3 
2 



45 



1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 



BLACKST 



Engl and 

Thailand 

TOT..L 



BOSTON PROPER 
BOSTON TOTi.L 2,73 



.ALLSTON 
Belgium 
Canada 
China 
Colombia 
Cuba 

Costa Rica 
Ecuador 
Egypt 
Greece 
Guatemala 
Haiti 
"Honduras 
Hong Kong 
Italy 
Lebanon 
Nicaragua 
Philippines 

W. Indies 

TOT..L 



BOSTON 
Af rica 
Argentina 
Australia 
Bahames 
Barbados 
Bermuda 
Brazil 
Canada 
Chile 
"China 
Colombia 
Costa Rica 
Cuba 
Czech o 
Denmark 
Dom o Rep . 
Ecuador 



2 

4 

22 

1 

1 
3 
7 
1 
24 
1 
3 
6 
4 

14 
1 
1 
6 
1 



102 



Egypt 

El Salvador 
~Encl and 



3 
6 
1 
3 

29 
2 
7 

20 

1 

122 

17 
4 
S 
1 
1 

17 
4 

6 

2 

22 



France 
Germany 

__ Greece 
Guatemala 
Guyana 
Haiti 
Honduras 

3 Hong Kong 
Hungary 
India 
Iran 
Ireland 
Israel 
Italy 157 

Jamaica 51 

Japan 5 

Korea 16 

Lebanon 6 

Liberia 2 

Mexico 9 

Netherlands 1 

IT. Zealand 1 

Nigeria 4 

Norv/ay 1 

Pakistan 8 

Panama 3 

Peru 4 

.Philippines 54 

Portugal 14 

Russia 3 

Scotland 5 

Singapore 1 
So. i-frica 6 

Spain 3 

Sv;eden 1 

Sv7itz. 4 

Thailand 7 

Trinidad 71 

Uruguay 1 

Venezuela 4 

Vietnam 2 

17. Indies 8_ 

TOT.X 955 



3 


Hong Kong 


2 


12 


India 


6 


48 


Italy 


9 


4 


Korea 


1 


3 


Lebanon 


1 


25 


Pakistan 


4 


9 


Paraguay 


1 


31 
3 


p8i u ippines 


1 
2 


64 
2 

15 
3 


Portugal 


1 


Thailand 


1 


Turkey 


1 


TOTAL 


76 



BRIGHTON 
Barbados 
Brazil 
Canada 
China 
Colombia 
Cuba 
Ecuador 
Egypt 
Greece 
Guatemala 
Honduras 



1 
3 

A 

12 

1 
3 
1 
1 
18 
1 
1 



CHARLESTON ;N 



Canada 


2 


Cuba 


1 


Italy 


5 


Philippines 


7 


Portugal 


6 


Vietnam 


1 


Switzerland 


2 


TOT/.L 


24 



DORCHESTER 



Antigua 

Barbados 

Belgium 

Bermuda 

Candda 

China 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 


1 
29 
1 
3 
3 
2 
9 
2 


Denmark 


3 


Dom «, Rep . 
Ecuador 
Engl and 


13 
2 

18 


France 


2 


Germany 
Greece 


2 
16 


Guatemala 


9 


Kuyana 
Haiti 


6 
111 


Honduras 


26 


India 


4 


Iraq 
Ireland 
Italy 
Jamaica 


2 
12 
29 
35 


Korea 


5 


Hex i co 
Nigeria 
Ilontserret 
Pakistan 


1 

2 

14 

1 


TOTAL 


418 



Page 3 



DORCHESTER 



(Con 
3 



t) 



Panama- 
Philippines 15 



Poland 

Portugal 

SOci-f rica 

Spain 

Trinidad 

Vietnam 

TA Indies 



10 
67 

5 
1 
76 
1 
5 



TOTAL 



183 



EAST BOSTON 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 

England 

Guatemala 

Greece 

Italy 

Mexico 



2 
4 

1 
7 

4 

148 
1 

Philippines 1 
Portugal 3 
Thailand 2 

Trinidad 4_ 

TOT..L 177 



HYDE 



JRK 



Canada 

Dom . Rep . 

Greece 

India 

Italy 

Ireland 

Jamaica 

Peru 

Portigal 

Thailand 

Vietnam 

TOT..L 



2 
2 

1 
1 
19 
5 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 



37 



JALA I C PL. -Ill 



Argentina 


4 


Albania 


1 


Barbados 


5 


Brazil 


2 


Canada 


4 


Chile 


1 


China 


1 


Colombia 


5 


Costa Rica 


6 


Cuba 


4 


Dom . Rep <, 


10 


Ecuador 


2 



Egypt 1 
El Salvador 1 
Greece 32 
Guatemala 4 
Honduras 11 
Hong Kong 1 
India 2 
Ireland 4 
Italy 7 
Jamaica 6 
Korea 1 
Netherlands 1 
Pakistan 2 
Philippines 5 
Portugal 1 
Spain 1 
Syria 1 
Thailand 1 
Trinidad 10 

Turkey 2_ 

TOTAL 139 



HAPTAPAN 

Antigua 4 

Australia 1 

Barbados 10 

Canada 2 

Congo 1 

Costa Rica 3 

England 4 

Greece 2 

Haiti 66 

Honduras 2 

Italy 1 

Ireland 3 

Jamaica 20 

Mexico 2 

iiontserrat 10 

Panama 1 

Philippines 2 

Trinidad 16 

.;. Indies 2 
TOTi-L 



152 



t\Xu -DV lEi_iij 

Italy 4 
Thailand 1_ 

tct:.l 5 



ROSLINDI-LE 

Argentina 4 

Barbados 1 

Canada 2 



Colombia 

Greece 

Italy 

Lebanon 

Russia 

Thailand 

Turkey 

TOTi.L 



1 
34 
20 
2 
7 
1 
1 



01 



ROXBURY 
Antigua 1 
Argentina 1 
Australia 2 
1 
:3 
2 
2 
6 
3 
.1 
1 
16 
4 

1 

.0 
.4 

7 

4 

iO 
1 
3 
Kuwait 2 

Lebanon 15 
Mexico 1 
iiontserrat 1 
Panama 1 
Philippines 5 
Portugal 65 
Russia 2 
Suitz. 1 
Syria 3 
Trinidad 60 
Turkey 2 
..ales 2 
..'„ Indies 5 
TOT..L 



34; 



SOUTH BOSTON 

.Argentina 2 

Canadc 6 

Chile 1 

China 3 

Germany 1 

Greece 3 



Guyana 

Ireland 

Italy 

Japan 

Korea 

Philippines 

Turkey 

total" 



1 
1 
6 

1 
1 
9 
1 



36 



BOSTOIT - TOTAL 
2,733 



Bahamas 


1 


BREI2STER 




Barbados 


23 


Canada 


2 


Canada 


2 


Korea 


1 


Colombia 


2 
2 6 


Thailand 


1 


Costa Ric< 


tot;.l 


4 


Dom. Rep* 


3 






Engl and 


11 






Germany 


1 


BRaINTREE 




Greece . 


36 


Crnada 


1 


Guatemala 


4 


China 


1 


Guyana 


1 


Engl and 


1 


Haiti 


10 


j.naia 


1 


Honduras 


14 


Italy 


4 


India 


7 


Netherlands 


1 


Italy 


4 


So<,--f rica 


1 


Jamaica 


50 


Thailand 


1 


Jordan 


1 
3 


Venezuela 


1 


Korea 


TOT;\L 


12 



BRIDGE. .ATER 

Indi a 2 

Poland 4 

Portugal 20 

TOT„L 2 6 



BRCCKTOIT 

Argentina 

Australia 

Canada 

Colombia 

England 

Greece 

Haiti 

Hungary 

Ireland 

Italy 

Jamaica 

Korea 

Lebanon 






3 
3 
20 
1 
1 
2 
6 
2 
4 

10 



Page 4 



Poland 
Portugal 
Vietnam 
TOTAL 



BROOKFIELD 
So, ..frica 



BROOKLINE 
Argentina 

Austria 

Brazil 

Bulgaria 

Canada 

China 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Egypt 

El Salvador 

Engl amd 

Prance 

Germany 

Greece 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

Hong Kong 

India 

Ireland 

Israel 

Jamaica 

Japan 

Korea 

iiexico 

Palestine 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Portugal 

So. Africa 

Singapore 

Sweden 

SwitZo 

Thailand 

Trinidad 

Turkey 

Venezuela 

Vietnam 

wales 

TO r A.L 



2 Q 



u 



BURLIITGT01T 

Canada 

China 

Colombia 

Ecuador 



97 



2 
2 

2 
2 

19 
8 

18 
2 
3 
3 
5 
1 
3 
7 
2 
3 
5 
3 
6 
2 
3 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



128 



1 
2 
2 
2 



Engl and 1 

Hungary 1 

Italy 1 

Korea 1 

Lebanon 2 

Iiexico 1 

Norv;ay 1 

Scotland 2 

Syria 1 

Vietnam 1_ 

TOTx.L 19 



2 
1 
3 
1 



BOURNE 

England 

Greece 

Spain 

Taiv.'an 

TOTAL 



CAiiB RIDGE 

Argentina 2 

Bahames 3 

Barbados 24 

Bermuda 2 

Brazil 2 

Canada 19 

China 31 

Colombia 10 

Costa Rica 4 

Cuba 1 

Czech. 1 

Denmark 1 

Dom Rep 1 

Egypt 5 

El Salvador 3 

England 9 

Finland 1 

France 6 

Germany 6 

Greece 79 

Guatemala 2 

Haiti 22 

Honduras 1 

Hong Kong 2 

India 45 

Ireland 1 

Israel 1 

Italy 35 

Jamaica 28 

Japan 6 

Kenya 1 

Korea 4 

Netherlands 2 

iiexico 3 

Nicaragua 2 



Nigeria 1 

Norway 1 

Pakistan 10 

Panama 4 

Peru 1 
Philippines 4 

Eoland 1 

Portugal 294 

Romania 2 

Russia 1 

Scotland 1 

So. Africa 7 

Spain 1 

Sv;itz. 1 

Taiwan 1 

Thailand 4 

Trinidad 4 

Turkey 1 

Venezuela 5 

Vietnam 1_ 

TOTAL 715 



CANTON 

Canada 

Germany 

Greece 

Haiti 

Ireland 

Italy 

Philippines 

Portugal 



1 
3 
1 
1 
6 
4 

1 



TOT-L 



CARLISLE 



21 



Philippines^ 
TOfAL 



CHELSEA 

Barbados 

Colombia 

Engl and 

Egypt 

Greece 

India 

Ireland 

Italy 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Poland 

Portugal 

Scotland 

Trinidad 

TOTAL 



24 



CHICOPEE 



CLINTON 



1 
3 
1 
4 
2 
2 
2 
14 
6 
2 
5 
1 
3 
7 



53 



Canada 


13 


Colombia 


1 


Germany 


4 


Greece 


2 


Italy 


1 


Korea 


3 


Iiexico 


1 


Philippines 


2 


Poland- 


6 


Portugal 


61 


TOTAL 


94 



Jamaica 


1 


Canada 
England 


1 
I 






Guyana 


1 


CARVER 
Canada 


1 


Jamaica 

Poland 

TOTAL 


1 
5 
9 


CHATHAM 
Dom „ Rep 
Korea 


1 
1 


COILS SET 
Brazil 
- Italy 
Korea 


L 


TOT.X 


2 


1 

1 






TOTAL 


3 


CIIELHSFORD 








Australia 

Canada 

China 

Greece 

Korea 

Portugal 


1 
2 
2 
3 
5 
10 


CONCORD 
Canada 
Engl and 
Italy 
Jamaica 


3 

1 

12 

2 



Page 5 



CONCORD 
i-iexico 

Syria 

Vietnam 

TOTAL 



( Con • t ) 

2 
2 

1 



DANVERS 

Austria 

Canada 

Germany 

Greece 

India 

Italy 

Korea 

Thailand 

Turkey 

TOTAL 



DALTOIT 
Bermuda 



DARTAOUTH 

Bermuda 

Canada 

Engl and 

Greece 

Germany 

Korea 

Portugal 

Uruguay 

Vietnam 

TOTAL 



DEDHAI-i 

Canada 

Engl and 

Greece 

Germany 

Italy 

Lebanon 

tot;x 



DOVER 
Korea 



DRi.CUT 

Germany 

Korea 

Panama 

TOTAL 



23 



1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 



10 



3. 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
22 
1 
3 



37 



2 

4 

7 

1 
9 



23 



1 
1 
2 



DUDLEY 
Canada 
Italy 
llexicQ 

Poland 
TOT..L 



1 
4 

1 
6 



12 



1 
1 
2 
1 
2 



EASTIIAI1PTOH 

Canada 

Germany 

Greece 

Scotland 

Spain 

TOTAL 



EASTON 
Ireland 



EDGARTOAN 
Netherlands 1 



EVERETT 

China 

Canada 

Colombi a 

Greece 

Hungary 

India 

Ireland 

Italy 

Japan 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Philippines 

Portugal 

Thail and 

Turkey 

tot;.l 



FaIRAAVEN 

Canada 

Costa Rica 

Noruay 

Portugal 

TOTAL 



1 
4 

6 

1 

1 

4 

3 

64 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



93 



3 
1 
2 

15 



21 



E^LiiOUTII 

Belgium 

Canada 

China 

Englrnd 

Germany 



1 
4 

2 
6 

1 



Hungary 1 

Ireland 1 
Jamaica 

Japan 1 

Korea 1 

Aexico 1 

iiorocco 1 
Philippines 3 

Portugal 31 

Vietnam 3 
TOTaL 



59 



FALL RIVER 

Bar b ados 

Brazil 

Canada 

China 

Cuba 



Engl and 

Greece 

Hong Kong 

India 

Italy 

Japan 

Korea 

Nigeria 

Philippines 3 

Portugal 73S 

Spain 1 

Syria 

TOTAL 



I 

5 
2 
3 
5 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
2 
1 



7G2 



KITCHBURG 

Canada 11 

Ecuador 1 

Finland 2 

Greece 3 

Guatemala 1 

Italy 6 

Japan 3 

Jo r don 2 

Portugal 2 

Thailand 2 

Vietnam 1_ 

TOTAL 34 



F0X30R0 
Greece 
Indi a 
Italy 
He\: Eeal 
Phil i ppi n es 2 
TO'AAL 9 



1 
1 
4 
1 



FRAMIgGHAM 

;.ustria 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Colombia 

Canada 

Egypt 

El Salvador 

Engl and 

Germany 

Greece 

Indi a 

Italy 

Jamaica 

Korea 

Peru 

Philippines 

Portugal 

Romania 

Russia 

Scotland 

Sv/eden 

Thailand 

Tunisia 

Trinidad 

Vietnam 

T0TAL 



2 
1 
3 
2 
11 
1 
7 
2 
1 
46 
13 
14 
1 
S 
2 
1 
24 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 



151 






JTKLIN 



Irelanc 
Lebanon 
Italy 

tot:x 



FRAETOAN 
Japan 
Trinidad 
TOT^L 



GARDNER 

Canada 

Colombia 

Finland 

Italy 

Thailand 

TOTAL 



GLOUCEST: 

Canada 

Engl and 

Italy 

Korea 

Portugal 



1 
3 
1 



1 
1 



13 
1 
1 
2 
3 



20 



2 

1 
74 

1 
17 



Page 6 



GLOUCESTER 
Peru 
Turkey 
Vietnam 


(Con't) 
22 

2 

1 


HAI-IPDEN 
Philippines 

HAMPTON 

Canada 

Korea 


1 

1 
1 


HINGHAM 

Canada 

Engl a nd 

Greece 

Guatemala 

Italy 

Korea 


1 
5 

1 


TOTQL 


120 

6 
1 
1 
8 


2 

8 
2 


GRAFTON 

Canada 
Haiti 
Korea 
Philippines 


TOTAL 

HANSON 

Italy 

Portugal 


2 

1 
1 


~ TOTAL 

KOLBROOK 
Philippines 

HOLDEN 


19 

1 


TOTAL 


16 






TOTAL 


2 





GR. BARRINGTON 
Ecuador 



GREENFIELD 

Brazil 

Cuba 

Engl and 

Spain 

TOTAL 



GROT ON 
Germany 
Vietnam 
TOTaL 



GROVELAND 
India 
Korea 
TOTaL 



HaDLEY 

England 

Italy 

Korea 

Poland 

TOTaL 



HALIFAX 
Korea 



HAMILTON 

Crnada 

China 

Jamaica 

TOTAL 



1 
7 

1 
1 



10 



1 
1 



1 

1 



1 
1 
5 
1 



8 



1 

1 
1 



HARDUICK 

Canada 

Engl and 

Greece 

Panama 

Vietnam 

TOTAL 



HARVARD 
Colombia 
Engl and 
TOTAL 



HANOVER 

Korea 



HATFIELD 
Poland 



HAVERHILL 

Canada 

Cyprus 

Dom . Rep o 

Engl and 

Greece 

Ireland 

Italy 

Philippines 

Pol and 

Spain 

Turkey 

Vietnam 

Venezuela __ 

TOTAL 



3 
3 

1 

1 
1 



1 
1 



3 
6 

1 
6 

r> 
O 

4 
19 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
5 



62 



India 



HOLLISTON 

Canada 2 

Colombia 1 

Ecuador 1 

Germany 1 

Korea 1 

iiexico 2 
TOTAL 



HOLYOKE 

Brazil 

Canada 

Colombia 

Costa Rica 

Engl and 

Germany 

India 

Ireland 

J pan 

Korea 

Poland 

TOTAL 



HOPKINTON 
Italy 



HUDSON 

B razil 

Canada 

Greece 

India 

Italy 

Portugal 

Thailand 

TOTAL 



8 



3 

6 

22 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
5 

1 



44 



10 

4 

1 
3 
4 

132 

1 



HULL 

Canada 

Greece 

Italy 

Japan 

TOTAL 



HUNTINGTON 
Korea 



IPSUICH 

Canada 

Engl and 

Greece 

Poland 

Thailand 

TOTAL 



KINGSTON 
Engl and 
Indi a 
TOTAL 



LANCASTER 

Canada 

Jamaica 

Portugal 

Vietnam 

TOTAL 



LAURENCE 

Bolivia 

Canada 

Chile 

China 

Costa Rica 

Cuba 

Dom o Rep o 

Ecuador 

Germany 

Greece 

Guatemala 

Haiti 

India 

Italy 

Jordan 

Korea 

Lebanon 

N.Zealand 



2 

1 

14 

3 



20 



1 
1 
3 
1 
1 



2 
1 



2 
2 
8 

1 



13 



2 

49 

1 

1 

1 

9 

110 

13 

1 

1 

6 

1 

1 

19 

1 

21 

25 

1 



155 



Page 7 



LAURENCE (Con't) LINCOLN 



Peru 

Portugal 

Spain 

Thailand 

EOTAL 



LEE 

Canada 
Wales 
TOTAL 



LEEDS 
Canada 



LEICESTER 
Japan 



LEXINGTON 

Argentina 

Barbados 

China 

England 

Germany 

Greece 

India 

Iran 

Ireland 

Italy 

Jamaica 

Japan 

Jordan 

Peru 

Philippines 

Spain 

Vietnam __ 

TOTaL 



1 

53 

2 

2 



321 



1 
1 



1 
1 
8 
5 
2 
2 
4 

2 

3 
7 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 



45 



France 
Germany 
I^aly 
TOTaL 



LEOMINSTER 




Belgium 


1 


Canada 


15 


Engl and 


3 


Denmark 


2 


Germany 


2 


Greece 


3 


Indi a 


2 


Italy 


4 


Jordan 


13 


Kenya 


1 


Korea 


3 


Peru 


1 


TOTAL 


65 



LITTLETON 
Engl and 
France 
TOTAL 



LONOMEaDOU 

Canada 

Colombia 

England 

India 

TOTaL 



LOUELL 



2 

1 
1 



4- 



2 

1 



5 
1 
1 
2 



Bahames 


1 


Bolivia 


1 


Brazil 


14 


Canada 


2 


Colombia 


3 


Dora, Rep. 


1 


Ecuador 


1 


Engl and 


1 


Germany 


1 


Greece 


34 


Haiti 


1 


Hong Kong- 


1 


India 


8 


Jamaica 


2 


Jaoan 


1 


Korea 


4 


Lebanon 


3 


Mexico 


2 


Pakistan 


2 


Portugal 


167 


Spain 


1 


Svjeden 


2 


Syria 


3 


Thailand 


1 


Turkey 


3 






TOTAL 258 



LUDLO'. 

Brazil 1 

Canada 2 
Philippines 7 

Poland" 5 

•Portugal 226 

Spain 4 

Vietnam 1 



1 
1 



LUNENBURG 
Canada 

Korea 

TOTAL 



LYNN 

Canada 9 

China 1 
Costa Rica 5 

Dom . Reo . 1 6 

Egypt 2 

Engl and 4 

Germany 2 

Greece 60 

Guyana 1 

Honduras 2 
Indonesia 1 

Italy 6 

Jamaica 1 

Korea 2 

Nether. 1 

Phil. 3 

Poland 1 

Tunisia 1 

Trinidad 1 



Turkey 
TOTAL 



123 



LYNNFIELD 
Jamaica 1 
Korea 1 
Portugal 4 

Vi e tn am 4_ 

TOTaL 10 



HALDEN 
Argentina 2 
12 

2 

\ 

3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
29 
2 



Canada 

Colombia 

Dom . Rep „ 

Egypt 

England 

Finland 

Greece 

Guyana 

Haiti 

India 

Jamaica 

Italy 

Israel 

Norway 

Peru 

phil . 

Trinidad 



1 
1 
5 
1 



Turkey 1 

Yugsolavia 1_ 

TOTAL 69 



MANSFIELD 
Portugal 



MANCHESTER 

Canada 1 
Chile 2 

Philippines 1 

Spain 2_ 

TOT^L 6 



KARBLEHEAD 

Canada 2 

Finland 1 

Greece 3 

Indi a 1 

Jamaica 1 

Romania 1_ 

TOTaL 9 



MARLBORO 

Canada 4 

China 2 

Czech. 1 

Ecuador 2 

Germany l 

Greece 1 

Guatemala 4 

India 1 

Japan 1 

Korea 1 

Turkey 1_ 

TOT^L 19 



MANGOLIA 

Bermuda 



H'J>TCHESTER 
Honduras 



MARION 
England 



M^RSHFIELD 
Canada 1 

England 1_ 

TOTxJ, 2 



J! 



EOTiiL 



246 



Page 



jmYNARD 




Scotland 


3 


NAHANT 




NEWBURYPORT 




England 


1 
1 


Uruguay 


1 


Greece 
Ireland 


2 
2 


Canada 
Israel 


2 


India 


KOTAL 


19 


2 


Philippines 


1 






Scotland 


1 
5 


Italy 


1 


TOTAL 


3 






TOTAL 


TOTAL 


5 






MERRIMAC 
















Germany 


1 










MEDFIELD 








NATICK 




NEWTON 




Korea 


6 






Argentina 1 


Bahamas 


1 


Italy 


6 


HETHUEN 




Canada 


2 


Canada 


13 


Philippines 


6 


Canada 


4 


Germany 


1 


Chile 


2 


TOTAL 


18 


Dom . Rep . 


3 


Greece 


4 


China 


5 






Engl and 


4 


India 


4 


Colombia 


2 






India 


1 


Ireland 


1 


Cuba 


1 


HEDFORD 




Italy 


1 


Italy 


8 


Egypt 


1 


Argentina 


1 


Korea 


1 


Israel 


1 


Engl and 


6 


Barbados 


1 


Lebanon 


6 


Korea 


4 


France 


1 


Bulgaria 


2 


Portugal 


6 


Phil . 


1 


Germany 


2 


Canada 


8 
2 

1 


Scotland 

Spain 


2 

1 


Thailand 


1 


Greece 

Haiti 

India 


6 


China 


TOTAL 


28 


3 


Colombia 


TOTi.L 


29 


5 


Cuba 


1 










Indonesia 


12 


Egypt 


1 






NEEDHAI1 




Ireland 


5 


England 


10 


UIDDLETON 




Brazil 


1 


Israel 


2 


Greece 


14 


Colombia 


1 


Canada 


3 


Italy 


41 


Guyana 


1 






China 


2 


Jamaica 


6 


Haiti 


5 






Colombia 


5 


Korea 


9 


Honduras 


1 


HIDDLEBURY 




Hungary 


2 


Lebanon 


5 


India 


2 


Philippines 


2 


Italy 


4 


Morocco 


1 


Italy 


84 






Iran 


1 


Panama 


1 


Jamaica 


3 






Jamaica 


1 


Philippines 


13 


Poland 


3 


i-IILFORD 




Lebanon 


1 


Poland 


2 


Portugal 


15 


Brazil 


1 


Thailand 


1 


Portugal 


9 


Russia 


1 


Canada 


1 


Australia 1 


Romania 


1 


So .Africa 
Syria 


2 
1 


Italy 
Korea 


21 






Scotland 

So. Africa 


1 
7 


1 


TOTAL 


22 


Thailand 


1 
2 


Portugal 


39 






Switz. 

Syria 

Thailand 


1 


Venezuela 


TOTAL 


63 


1 


Uo Indies 


1 






NET: BEDFOr 


1 


TOTAL 


163 






Brazil 


13 


Trinidad 


1 






MILLIS 
Canada 


1 


Canada 
China 


3 
2 


Turkey 


2 




TOTAL 


L74 


MEDIi'/iY 




Germany 


1 


Engl and 


3 






Canada 


1 
1 


Portugal 


2 


Germany 
Greece 


1 
1 


NO. ADAMS 




Greece 


TOTAL 


4 




Korea 


1 






Guatemala 2 
Haiti 1 


Honduras 
Phil . 


3 


TOTAL 


3 


1 






HILTON 




lnaia 


- 


TOTAL 


4 


LIE L ROSE 




France 


1 


Jamaica 


1 






Canada 


2 


Ireland 


1 


Japan 


1 


NORTHAMPTON 




England 
Germany 
India 
Italy 


3 
1 
1 
2 


Norway 


1 


Korea 
Lebanon 
Phil. 
Pol and 
Portugal 


4 
1 
4 

2 

8S6 


Canada 
China 
Guyana 
Italy 


5 


TOTAL 


3 


7 
2 
3 


Korea 


4 


. 








Korea 


19 


Peru 


1 






So. Africa 4 
TOT^L 843 


Hong Kong 


2 


Poland 


1 






TOTI-L 


38 



Pare 9 



N0RTH30R0UGH 


2 


PE^BODY 


1 


Korea 4 
Philippines 3 


Romania 
Thailand 


2 


canaca 


2 


Vietnam 


2 
4 


Brazil 
i "anada 


2 

5 


Portugal 
Scotland 


4 
1 


Turkey 


2 


TOTx.L 


TOTAL 


95 






Colombia 


2 


Vietnam 


1 










Dom o Rep . 


62 


TOTAL 


33 






NORTHBRIDGB 




Engl and 


6 






RANDOLPH 




KOR1JA 


1 


France 


1 






Canada 


3 






Greece 


29 


plainvill 


S 


Greece 


2 






Germany 


1 


France 


1 


Italy 


5 


NORTHFIELD 




Ireland 


1 


Peiu 


1 


Korea 


2 


Korea 


1 


Korea 


5 


TOTAL 


2 


Scotland 


1 






Lebanon 
Poland 


1 
2 






Thailand 


4 




TOTAL 


17 


NORWELL 




Portugal 


218 


PLYMOUTH 








Korea 


1 


Scotland 


1 


Canada 


9 










Thailand 


2 


Engl and 


1 










tot;.l 


339 


Greece 


1 


RAYNliil 




NOR.JOOD 








India 


4 


Italy 


5 


Austria 


2 






Ireland 


1 


Korea 


1 


Canada 


6 


PELHAM 




Italy 
Korea 
Portugal 


1 


Portugal 


18 


Colombia 


1 


Canada 


1 


1 
19 


Vietnam 


1 


Egypt 


3 




total 


25 


France 


2 






Tli ail and 


1 






Germany 


1 


PEMBROKE 




Vietnam 


2 






«J- COCO 


1 


Argentina 


1 


TOTAL 


40 


- READING 
Berntttcra 


1 


Ireland 


1 


Canada 


1 






Canada 


6 


Italy 


6 

1 


Scotland 


1 




DWN 


England 
Iceland 


1 


Korea 


TOT^L 


3 


PROVINCET 


3 


Poland 


2 






Canada 


1 


Italy 
Korea 
Lebanon 


1 


Portugal 
TRINIDJ-n 


11 
1 


PEPPERELL 




Engl and 
Portugal 


1 
4 


2 
1 - 


TOT^L 


33 


Canada 


1 


Scotland 


5 


Scotland 
Spain 


1 

1 










TOTAL 


11 














TOTAL 


17 


NORTON 


1 


PETERSEAI-I 


1 


QUINCY 








Israel 


Canada 




Portugal 


7 

1 


Vietnam 
TOTAL 


1 


Argentina 


2 

1 


REHOBOTH 
Greece 




.Vietnam 


2 


Australia 


7 


Venezuela 


2 






Canada 


4 






Peru 


1 






China 
Egypt 


7 
1 


RICHMOND 




TOTAL 


12 










PITTSFIELD 




Engl and 


9 


Egypt 


3 






Africa 


1 


Finland 


2 






PALMER 




Brazil 


4 


France 


1 






Italy 


7 


Canada 


1 


Greece 


3 


REVERE 




Japan 


1 


Czech 


1 


India 


3 


Argentina 


4 


Philippines 


1 


China 


2 


Ireland 


6 


Bermuda 


1 


Thailand 


1 


Engl and 


1 
1 


Italy 
Israel 


25 

4 


Colombia 
Engl and 


1 

5 


TOTAL 


10 


Germany 






Guyana 


2 


Japan 


2 


Germany 


1 






Iran 


2 


Korea 


2 


Irelrnd 


1 


PAXTON 




India 


1 


Lebanon 


3 


Italy 


71 


Vietnam 


1 


Italy 


7 


Mexico 


3 


Jamaica 


1 






Israel 


1 


Pakistan 


2 


Korea 


1 






Japan 


1 


Philippines 
Poland 


7 
2 


Philippines 
TOTAL 


3 




39 



Page 10 



ROCKLAND 
Turkey 



ROCKPORT 
Canada 



SALEM 

Brazil 

Canada 

Costa Rica 

Dom.Rep. 

Greece 

Italy 

Portugal 

Russia 

So. Africa 

Turkey 

W. Indies __ 

TOTAL 



SaUGUS 

Canada 

Czech. 

Engl and 

France 

Greece 

Italy 

Thailand 

TOT^L 



4 



SCITUATE 

India 

Korea 

Norway 

Panama 

Portugal^ 

TOT.-L 



SEEKONK 
Portugal 
Thailand 
TOTAL 



SHARON 

Canada 

Colombia 

India 

Israel 

Italy 

Iraq 

TO'IAL 



1 
12 

1 
14 

1 
2E 
1 
2 
1 
1 



69 



7 
1 
3 
2 
3 
8 
3 



27 



1 
3 
1 
1 
15 



21 



5 
2 



1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 



1 
1 

1 



SHEFFIELD 
Engl and 
Jordan 
Korea 
TOTAL 



SHERBOURNE FALLS 
Vietnam 1 



SHERBORN 
Jamaica 
Korea 
TOTAL 



SHRE./SBURY 

Colombia 

England 

India 

Iran 

Italy 

Germany __ 

TOTAL 



SHUTESBURY 
Morocco 



SOMERSET 

Canada 

Engl and 

Egypt 

Guatemala 

Italy 

Portugal 

Romania 

TOTAL 



1 
1 



1 
3 
7 
1 
7 
2 



21 



1 
3 
3 

1 

1 

30 

1 



40 



9 



SOilERVILLE 

Argentina 5 

Austria 1 

Barbados 7 

Belgium 7 

Bermuda 1 

Brazil 1 

Canada 10 

China 10 

Costa Rica 1 

Ecuador 2 

Egypt 1 

El Salvador 2 

England 2 



Germany 1 

Greece 35 

Guatemala 2 

.Haiti 24 

Kong Kong 2 

Indi a 5 

Italy 154 

Jamaica 

Japan 

Jordan 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Nicaragua 

JPakistan 

Philippines 

Portugal 

Switz. 

Syria 

Trinidad 

Turkey 

TOTAL 



3 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
171 
1 
2 

3 



464 



SOUTHBORO 

India 

Italy 

Korea 

Syria 

TOTAL 



SOUTIIBRIDGE 

Canada 

Germany 

Greece 

Poland 

Portugal 

TOTAL 



1 
2 
I 
6 



10 



2 

1 
9 
1 
2 



15 



SOUTHAMPTON 
Canada 



south; ;ick 

Greece 

Ireland 

TOTAL 



1 
5 



SPENCER 
Greece 
Thailand 
TOT.xL 



1 
1 



SPRINGFIELD 

Africa 2 

Austria 1 

Barbados 6 

Canada 24 

China 1 

Colombia 3 

Czech. 2 

Dom.Rep. . 2 

Egypt 1 

Engl and 5 

France . 1 

Greece 34 

Haiti 1 

India 2 

Iran 1 

Ireland 1 

Italy 94 

Jamaica 35 

Jordan 2 

Korea 4 

Lebanon 1 

Mexico 2 

Pakistan 2 

Panama 1 

Paraguay 1 
Philippines 3 

Poland 16 

Portugal 74 

Russia 1 

Thailand 6 

Trinidad 6 

Turkey 6 

Vietnam 1 

Uales 1_ 

TOIAL 344 



STERLING 

Germany 1 

Th a i 1 and 1_ 

tot;.l 2 



STOCKBRIDGE 
Egypt 1 

Poland 2_ 

TOTAL 3 



STONEHAM 



Argentina 


7 


Canada 


2 


Chile 


2 


Italy 


4 


Korea 


5 


Lebanon 


3 


Philippines 


3 



Page 11 



STONEKAM (Con't) 


Libya 


1 


t.ALTHAH 




Jordan 


2 


Scotland 


2 


Phil. 


4 


Argentina 


6 


Korea 


10 


Trinidad 


1 


Portugal 216 


Brazil 


1 


Lebanon 


S 


Yuqoslavia 


1 


Spain 


1 


Canada 


32 


Ilexico 


1 


TOT..L 


35 


Thailand 


1 


Colombia 


2 


Portugal 


2 






Venezuela 


3 


El Salvador 1 


Syria 


8 






Vietnam 


1 


Engl and 


9 


Turkey 


15 


STOUGHTON 




TOTAL 250 


Greece 


3 


Thailand 


1 


Honduras 


1 






Guatemala 


1 


Vietnam 


1 


Ilexico 


1 






Guyana 


3 


TOT-.L 


176 


Portugal 114 


TE17KSBURY 




Haiti 


9 






Thailand 


1 


Canada 


1 


India 


10 






Trinidad 


1 


Korea 
Italy 


5 
2 


Irel and 
Italy 


2 
29 


WAYLAND 
Barbados 




TOT..L 113 


3 






Netherlands 


1 


Jamaica 


4 


China 


1 






TOTi.L 


9 


Japan 


1 


England 


1 


sto;?e 








Korea 


1 


Philippines 


1 


China 


3 


TISKURY 




Lebanon 

i-iontserrat 


5 
1 


TOTAL 


6 






Portugal 


1 


Pakistan 


2 






SUDBURY 


1 






Peru 
Philc 


1 
3 


..SBSTER 




Canada 


Canada 


5 


Italy 


3 


TOWNSEND 




So. Africa 


1 


Greece 


2 


Honduras 


4 


Philippines 


1 


Syria 


2 


Poland 


1 


Italy 


3 
2 


Vietnam 
TOT..L 


1 
2 


Thailand 


3 


TOTAL 


8 


Jamaica 


TOTAL 


L32 






Korea 


1 














Philippines 


1 










WELLE SLEY 




Thailand 


1 


TYITGSBORO 




WARE 




Austria 


1 


TOT^L 


16 


Indonesia 


6 


China 


1 


Canada 


8 






Netherlands 

total 


1 
& 


Poland 


3 


China 
Ccsta Rica 


1 




TOTAL 


4 


1 


SWAMPSCOTT 












Engl and 


1 


Canada 


3 










Greece 


1 


England 


1 

1 


;.AKE FIELD 

Canada 

Italy 


2 
6 


■ ■*■*' -;■> — ITT' ? j 


2 
4 


India 

Iran 

Ireland 


2 


Iraq 


Canada 
Greece 


1 


TOTAL 


5 


1 






Korea 


3 


Portugal 


2 


Italy 


2 






Lebanon 


1 


Thailand 


1 


. Korea 


2 


SWANSEA 




Philippines 


1 


TOTAL 


9 


Philippines 


1 


Lebanon 


1 


Syria 


17 






Spain 


5 


Portugal 


13 
14 


Turkey 


1 


WATERTOWN 




Syria 
Turkey 


1 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 


31 


1 










Australia 


1 


TOTAL 


29 










Argentina 


3 






tauhtoh 




WALPOLE 




Canada- 


5 


[JENHAfI 




Argentina 


2 


Austria 


1 


Colombia 


1 


Canada 


1 


Brazil 


10 


Costa Rica 


1 


Costa Rica 


2 






Canada 
Costa Rica 


2 

1 


Greece 
Japan 


1 

1 


Cuba 
Egypt 


3 
5 


WE5TBORO 


1 
1 
1 


Egypt 


2 

1 


Phil . 


2 


Ecuador 

Finland 


5 

1 


Canada 
France 


Greece 


TOTAL 


6 


India 


1 






Germany 


1 


Germany 


Italy 
Japan 


2 
2 






Greece 
India 
Ireland 
Italy 


51 
4 
1 

45 


Philippines 

total 


2 
5 



Page 12 



SflTESTFIELD 


7 


WEYMOUTH 

Bermuda 


1 


Nicaragua 
Portugal 


1 
2 


Iraq 
Ireland 


1 


Canada 


3 


China 


1 


Canada 


2 


Scotland 


2 


. Italy 


45 


Engl and 


3 


China 


1 


TOT^L 


34 


Jamaica 


7 


Germany 


1 


France 


1 






Japan 


2 


Greece 


2 


Guyana 


4 






Korea 


16 


India 


1 


Italy 


7 


WINTHROP 




Lebanon 


10 


Ireland 


6 


Japan 


1 


I.rgentina 


2 


Mexico 


1 


Italy 


2 


Lebanon 


4 


Canada 


2 


Morocco 


1 


N. Zealand 


1 


Philippines 


1 


Egypt 


1 


Pakistan 


5 


Poland 


2 

2 


Scotland 


4 


Engl and 
Finland 
Greece 


1 

1 
4 


Philippines 

Poland 

Portugal 


1 


Thailand 


TO$AL 


26 


9 


tot;.l 


23 


5 










India 


1 


Scotland 


1 






WHITMAN 




Ireland 


2 


So » Africa 


1 


WESTFORD 




Canada 


1 


Italy 


1 


Svjeden 


1 


Engl and 


1 


India 


1 


Korea 


1 


Syria 


1 


Greece 


2 


Korea 


1 


Yugoslavia 


1 


Thailand 


2 


Korea 


2 


Vietnam 


1 


TOTAL 


17 


Trinidad 


1 


Phil . 


1 


total 


4 






Turkey 
Vietnam 


8 


TOTAL 


6 


3 






WILLIAMSBURG 

Jaioan 


1 


WOBURN 
Brazil 


1 


Yugoslavia 

TOTAL 


1 


W. NEWBURY 


302 


Germany 1 
Netherlands 1 


Thailand 
TOTAL 


5 
6 


Canada 

Gelombia 

Cuba 


2 

1 
2 


WRENTHAM 




Sweden 


1 






Engl and 
Germany 


5 
1 
2 


Scotland 


1 


TOTAL 


3 


WILBRAHAM 
















Greece 










Canada 


1 


India 


4 


YARMOUTH 




WESTPORT 


2 

1 
1 


England 


1 


. Pfealy 
Korea 
Morocco 


11 

1 
1 


Canada 
Greece 

TOTAL 


4 


Colombia 


total 


2 


2 


England 
Phil. 


6 






Portugal 


6 






Portugal 


1 


WILLIAMSTOWN 






1 






TOTAL 


5 


Germany 


2 


Thailand 
TOT^L 






38 










Ireland. 


1 














TOTAL 


3 






SUMM^Ri 


WESTON 








WORCESTER 




Pages 1 thru 


12 


Haiti 


4 






^lbania 


1 






Honduras 


1 


WILMINGTON 




Argentina 


1 


GRAND TOTi.L 




Korea 
Poland 


1 
1 


Korea 
Switz<, 


1 
1 


Barbados 
Canada 


5 
14 


12.049 




TOT/.L 


7 


TOTxAL 


2 


China 
Cuba 


2 
2 






WESTOVER 




WINCHESTER 
Canada 


1 


Dom «, Rep o 
Ecuador 


1 
1 






Canada 
Vietnam 


1 
1 


Chile 
China 


3 

7 


Egypt 
Engl and 


5 
8 






TOTAL 


2 


Colombia 


1 


Finland 


1 










Engl and 


1 


France 


1 










Greece 


3 


Germany 


O 






WESTWOOD 

England 


1 


Kong Kong 
India 


1 
3 


Greece 
Guyana 


96 






Japan 


1 


Indonesia 


1 


Haiti 


1 






Korea 


3 


Ireland 


1 


Kong Kong 


1 






Netherlancs 
TOTAL 


; 1 
6 


Italy 
Sc^f rica 


4 
3 


India 
Iran 


23 
2 







m& 



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